RVS Trustees Using Multiple Means to Influence Change

RVS Trustees Using Multiple Means to Influence Change

Superintendent of Schools – Last week I spent three days in Edmonton – with all eight RVS trustees on Monday and Tuesday for the Alberta School Boards Association (ASBA) fall annual general meeting, and then with a group of four trustees for the new trustee orientation put on by the ASBA on Wednesday. These ASBA meetings happen twice a year where trustees from across Alberta get together to discuss policy issues, as well as partake in professional learning. As a staff member, my role is to learn with our trustees and be there to support them as they have questions about the policy topics being discussed.

At the business session, there were four policy motions put forward from boards from across Alberta. One policy position was put forward from RVS trustees. The Board took the opportunity to bring up the topic of high school funding when they met with the Minister of Education last spring, but also decided to use the ASBA as a further advocacy approach. The Board wrote up a motion urging government to adjust the funding for high schools participating in Moving Forward With High School Design (MFWHSR). Many school divisions have embraced the approach of MFWHSR and are leveraging the pilot to create flexible learning environments for students. Alberta Education originally stated that high schools would be funded on a three (3) year rolling average (2010/11, 2011/12, 2012/13 schools years) of the credit enrolment units (CEUs) earned by students. This rolling average funding model would recognize, via additional funding, schools that were able to help students achieve the outcomes of a course. If students generated more CEUs over time, then funding would be provided to recognize and support the provision of the additional learning opportunities. However, Alberta Education has since frozen funding at the 2010/11, 2011/12, 2012/2013 historical rates and has not rolled forward the average based on the actual CEU earned by students in the pilot. For RVS, this means we are getting about one million less dollars each year because the grants do not reflect actual CEUs earned by our students since 2013. Providing these additional learning opportunities costs money and schools are having to revisit providing more opportunities for students as a result of the funding in the MFWHSR pilot not keeping pace with the credits students are generating.

Good news is that the vast majority of other Boards agreed that ASBA should urge government to update the funding model to reflect the original intent of a three-year rolling average. The ASBA can only urge / request government to make changes, but it is important to have the support of ASBA for proposed changes.

I just wanted to share an example of how our Board uses multiple advocacy streams as a mean to address issues.

Greg

Highlights from Joint Board / School Council Meeting

Highlights from Joint Board / School Council Meeting

Superintendent of Schools – Last week the Board of Trustees hosted school council representatives and school administrators at their semi-annual Joint Board/School Council meeting. The evening started with Ms. Jill Quirk from Heloise Lorimer School and her STEAM team of student leaders who work in the school to help with coding, robotics and more. We had Ms. Krista Wunsch, also from Heloise Lorimer, with four of her students who have been learning with Elders and Knowledge Keepers on the topic of Treaty 7. Lastly, we had Mr. Vernon Gray from W.H. Croxford in attendance with five students who shared their photography from the Visual Arts & Media Academy. It was great to get the event started with a focus on how we make learning visible and real in our schools.

The emphasis for the rest of the evening was digging deeper into a question we ask annually as part of our parent satisfaction survey. We wanted to hear from parents specifically about if they feel informed about their child’s progress and achievement, what schools are doing that is working to help inform them, and what strategies we could attempt in an effort to improve communication about their child’s progress.

We used on online polling tool where people answered questions on their mobile device and instantly their comments were collected and shared back with the group. The technology worked flawlessly and over about 45 minutes, we were able to collect some really good feedback. The results were interesting because for one person strategy X was a strength and for another person strategy X was listed as something we could do to improve. For one person strategy Z was seen as a positive, while someone else rated that same strategy as not really working for them.

We will take those results and see how we can use that information to improve satisfaction in that area. After collecting the feedback, we shared a brief presentation about how we are attempting to communicate student learning. We had hoped to dig into one other area from our satisfaction survey, but ran out of time. I guess we already have one topic for our spring meeting!

Thanks to all parents and school administrators who were able to attend and share their thoughts with us on that evening.

Greg

New Board on Board

New Board on Board

Superintendent of Schools – On Monday, Oct. 16, voters from across Alberta elected new mayors, councilors and trustees and the shape of local government changed. In RVS, due to ward boundary changes and incumbents choosing not to seek re-election, we were going to have a minimum of five new trustees on our Board of eight. A few of us waited up until the wee hours on Tuesday, Oct. 17 to see the final results. At that moment we had three acclaimed trustees and five trustee elects, and within those eight we had three veteran trustees (we don’t call them “old” trustees) and five first time trustees.

On Friday, Oct. 20, the results became official and our eight trustees were sworn in / affirmed at a public ceremony at our Education Centre on Tuesday, Oct. 24. Upon swearing in, the “old” Board finished their work and a “new” Board was formed. Congratulations to our new trustees and thank you so much to our former trustees.

While the eight officially were trustees on Oct. 24, the work had already started. Emails were flying around 1 a.m. on Oct. 17 as I congratulated them on their elections/acclamation and asked them to book a bunch of dates in their calendar. We had two orientation type events prior to the election date for all candidates. We had our first official orientation session on Thursday, Oct. 19 where we spent time getting to know each other, walked through the orientation plan, dealt with some of the required paperwork and forms, got them setup with technology, and walked through the swearing in ceremony.

Our second full day of orientation was on Tuesday, Oct. 24 where we discussed topics such as: trustee code of conduct, conflict of interest, organization meeting, how board meetings are organized, their role in emergency school closures related to inclement weather, how to do their own timesheets/expenses, and previous motions from the past couple of years. Then they had pictures taken. It was an incredibly busy day and we ran out of time so some other topics will need to be rescheduled.

The third orientation day was Thursday, Oct. 26 where the Board and myself spent the majority of the day with Dr. Leroy Sloan. The focus was on discussing what makes effective governance and clarifying the roles of trustees, the corporate Board and the Superintendent. Leroy connected the legislative framework that boards operate under along with a governance framework. A number of key policies were discussed, all intermixed with a bunch of interesting stories from Leroy. Trustees were also introduced and had a brief “meet and greet” event with Education Centre staff late in the day.

The orientation work continues with three days of Alberta School Boards Association work in late November followed by specific orientation meetings in December and January. We also integrate at least one orientation item after every Board meeting starting on Nov. 16 until April.

Being a trustee is tough work and, as staff, we work hard and spend lots of time early in the term to help trustees get off to a great start.

Greg

A Generative Governance Team

A Generative Governance Team

Director of Communications – As I turn my calendar from September to October, I can’t help but feel a bit melancholy. On October 16, a slate of new trustees will take the helm of Rocky View Schools, marking the departure of four veteran board members – all of whom have worked tirelessly to champion our students’ success.

Since the early ’90s, I’ve worked under a number of Superintendents helping to support nine Boards of Trustees; I believe this last set of trustees to be among the best. Under the leadership of Board Chair Colleen Munro, I witnessed a board look inward to clarify its role and re-emerge as a truly generative governance team, committed to community engagement practices, policy making and oversight, and advocacy.

Entrusting the operations of the jurisdiction to two Superintendents, over the last 48 months trustees ensured the voice of our school communities was heard by directing several community consultations be held on a variety of topics, such as four-year planning, attendance boundaries, student assessment, and ward boundaries. They re-wrote their own playbook, reducing the number of policies from over 200 to just 26. They advocated to government and achieved funding for six new schools and a major addition. And most importantly, they kept the needs of students and teachers at the forefront, setting and re-affirming across all four years that their number one budget priority be “direct classroom instruction”.

To Colleen Munro, current Board Chair and Ward 5 Trustee, I thank you for your leadership and setting in motion the Board’s role clarification process. Having served as a trustee for the last 10 years, your dedication to our students, communities, and public service is admirable.

To Bev LaPeare, Ward 2 Trustee, as one of RVS’ longest serving trustees with four terms and 13 years of service, your voice was always one of reason and common sense. Your undying advocacy to expand services for special needs students has left its mark on our jurisdiction.

To Sylvia Eggerer, Ward 3 Truste, I will miss you! Elected in a by-election in 2006 and now completing your third term, you have been a champion for every student and kept the needs of the classroom at the forefront of every decision.

To Helen Clease, our former Ward 4 Trustee who passed away July 27, 2017, after a short, but courageous battle with cancer, your absence after three terms has truly been our loss.

To the entire Board of Trustees, 2013-2017, thank you for keeping students at the centre of every decision; your governance has been commendable.