‘Tails’ from a Raccoon

‘Tails’ from a Raccoon

rockyOfficial Mascot (Re-post from Feb 2012) – When I was first approached to tell the story of how I came to be Rocky View Schools’ official mascot, I have to say that I was completely honoured and a little bit nervous. I had never written a blog before (although my paws are pretty dexterous, it’s hard to type without opposable thumbs), but I was up to the challenge! I think it’s safe to say that I’m the first Raccoon to have written a blog. Then again, as the mascot for RVS, I have probably done a few other things that Raccoons don’t usually get to do!

I got my start as a mascot thanks to Lance Rinehart, RVS’ Facilities Assistant, a very close friend of mine. Back in 2008, Lance had one of those light bulb-over-the-head kind of ideas: Rocky View Schools needed its very own division mascot. He did some research and then presented his idea to RVS’ Superintendent of Schools Greg Bass, who thought it was a great suggestion.

Shortly thereafter, Superintendent Bass presented Lance’s idea to the Board of Trustees who agreed that a mascot was just what RVS needed! Instead of the jurisdiction choosing the mascot, RVS created a contest for students to submit their best ideas. A small selection committee was struck and boy did they ever have their work cut out for them! After going through many creative entries, Rocky Raccoon was born based on a drawing submitted by a Grade 4 student named Ryan McHarg from Indus Elementary. Rocky Raccoon was officially introduced to the jurisdiction August 26, 2008 as part of RVS’ new brand.

As a mascot, I am RVS’ unofficial Ambassador responsible for bringing passion and goodwill to the entire jurisdiction. Being larger than life, I attract all kinds of attention and apparently I have created quite the presence in the community. One of the best parts of my job is when people tell me how much they love to see me at their school or their event and how my being there makes their day just a bit brighter.

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Another great thing about being a mascot is getting to meet so many wonderful people from all around the RVS community. Rocky View has so many fine young students and staff members that it makes me proud to be their mascot. Not only to do I get to meet them, but I also get to meet their families! Over the past few years, I’ve also got to meet local and provincial politicians and even the Calgary Flames Alumni Hockey Team – not too shabby for a Raccoon!

Since starting at Rocky View, I have really built up my resume. New skills include riding unicycles and scooters in parades, skating and playing hockey with students and teachers, climbing playground equipment, and participating in other sporting activities! I may not do everything as well as some of the students, but I always manage to bring smiles to the faces of everyone I see and meet. I am a pretty good dancer though and I certainly have gotten a few people up on their feet during an event or an assembly!

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If you haven’t guessed yet, I love my job as official mascot. I cannot say enough good things about the students and staff at Rocky View Schools. No matter where I go, whether it’s out to the schools or into the community, there is always at least one person that I can make smile or feel special and this reminds me why I do what I do and why it’s all so worthwhile. I love being apart of Rocky View and I can’t wait to see each and every one of you soon! I have made my mark here and it’s just going to get bigger with your support!

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Girls in Technology!

Girls in Technology!

RVS Learning Specialist – Friday November 18th was a fantastic day at the Education Centre in RVS! There were BB-8 robots whizzing around the room, bots making art, virtual reality rollercoaster trips, coding, and paper airplanes that could carry cargo.

Teachers and students from around our jurisdiction met to discuss the lack of girls and young women represented in STEAM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) in our schools. Even though it is 2016, statistics show that girls and boys are still choosing career paths that they feel are “gender appropriate”. Participants of the day were able to talk with young women to hear what it’s like to be a woman in STEAM in the real world. We spoke with Stephanie Campbell, an engineer at Google, who has found herself in meetings with 50 people and has been the only female in the room. That doesn’t stop her from innovating and creating incredible things. Maddie and Kedra from the WISE (Women in Science and Engineering) program at the U of C talked about supporting women in programs that have been traditionally dominated by men. Our RVS girls asked great questions like “What did you like to do when you were my age?” and “What advice would you give your younger self?” The girls came away with the knowledge that if you are curious and fascinated by STEAM, don’t be discouraged if you aren’t an expert. You will be successful if you know how to learn.

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It warmed the cockles of my heart to see a grade 3 girl struggle with getting her paper airplane to carry popsicles. She redesigned her plane several times and made a lot of test flights. By the end of the day it flew 3 metres, while carrying 10 popsicle sticks! She told me the secret was to make sure the sticks were even on each side. Another girl made an art-bot that drew circles. Her design was based on a toboggan because she thought sleds are slippery and she wanted her art bot to slide around the page, instead of vibrate or jump.

20161118_133044What the adults in the room came away with is that girls are inventors, designers and creators. When certain pressures or influences are removed, such as competitiveness, and they are just allowed to play, they will use iterative processes to make innovative creations. None of the girls gave up on things, even when they were frustrated. A certain secretary who couldn’t get her art bot to work, took it back to her desk to keep redesigning. Over lunch people near her work station could hear it buzzing. She was thrilled with her accomplishment and showed me her bot generated art.

Teachers and students are pushing ahead in the coming weeks to implement projects, clubs and initiatives that will encourage more girls in STEAM. Ask around your school to see what you are doing to support girls. The problems of today and the future will be solved by people in STEAM. Let’s make sure that we are providing opportunities for everyone to be exposed to STEAM at young ages, so they can discover if that is what they are interested in, without the background noise of what is “gender appropriate”.

 

 

Celebrating Achievements

Celebrating Achievements

Principal, R.J. Hawkey – Last week I received an email from a mother inquiring into a program at our school. She asked a series of questions, most of which were very typical. One question stood apart from the rest and caused me to think deeply. She asked “Will my son be celebrated as a male, or is everyone gender neutral?”.  Wow!

I have been an educator for a very long time and can’t remember a single instance of celebrating a child for their “boyness”, or “girlness” for that matter.  Most formal celebrations celebrate achievement; academic, athletic, artistic, or social. Special days also come to mind when I think of celebrating. Informal celebrations are a regular occurrence in an elementary school; high 5’s, hugs, fist pumps, and thumbs up. Yet, I don’t recall doing anything special specifically focused on gender.

I truly believe that each learner in our school is unique and special. At R.J. Hawkey we strive for “Safe, Caring, Connected Learning; Success for All”.  I take this seriously, working hard each day to create a school where each learner feels valued and safe to be themself.  Each learner should know he/she is cared for, connected to others within our school, community, city and world.  We meet our learners where they are in their learning journey, help them to learn more about themself as a learner and achieve success. Does it matter if they are a boy or a girl, man or woman? I’m not sure.

Over the span of my career I can’t recall a student or colleague who identified as gender neutral. I do know, that if and when I do, I will want the same things for the student as I do for everyone else.  Like everyone else, I am sure that the student will have lots of achievements to celebrate.

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