18 Random Observations About the First 2 Weeks of School

18 Random Observations About the First 2 Weeks of School

Superintendent of Schools – I try to be out at schools as much as possible. It can be a challenge with all the meetings I need to be part of, but it is important for me to connect with our students, staff and communities. Over the past week and a half, I’ve been at over 10 schools and these are just a few observations from those visits:

  • Kids are happy to be in school – serious;
  • Each of our schools are clean and well maintained due to the great work of our maintenance and custodial crews;
  • Our staff put tremendous efforts in building warm and welcoming learning environments;
  • Middle school students can really eat hotdogs;
  • Professional learning is critical;
  • The amount of paper that goes through a school office at this time of the year is daunting – we need to continue to find ways to automate processes and reduce the volume of paper going back and forth between school and home;
  • Building early connections between home and teacher/school is a great way to support the success of students;
  • Some school welcome back breakfasts can rival Stampede events;
  • We have over 35 new teachers who just graduated in 2017 that are keen to make a positive difference in our schools;
  • Principals and Assistant Principals are magicians in how they juggle so many competing demands on resources and their time;
  • Schools care about kids and do great things to support them to help achieve success;
  • Students consistently demonstrate that they value inclusion;
  • Opening a brand-new school is even more work than I thought it was and our staff who have been through it are owed a great amount of appreciation;
  • Teacher creativity is limitless;
  • Attendance in week one really matters – establish good routines to start the year off well;
  • School Councils provide meaningful ways to help shape your school – get involved;
  • RVS team members that work in support roles create the conditions that allow students to succeed; and
  • Sitting in day-long meetings is physically demanding.

I am so proud of our schools and our RVS team. I will continue to be out and about in our schools and communities so remember to stop me and say “hi”.

Greg

Restoring Relationships Between Nations

Restoring Relationships Between Nations

Settler Students Learning with Elders and Knowledge Keepers on Treaty 7 Territory

RVS Teacher, Heloise Lorimer School – Over the 2016-2017 school year, I collaboratively planned and facilitated learning opportunities centered on Indigenous-land based pedagogy. As a Settler, a non-Indigenous person, I have received guidance, knowledge and kindness from three Indigenous Knowledge Keepers. Together we facilitated sharing of Indigenous ways and offered land-based educational experiences to my students.

Heloise Lorimer School opened as a brand-new school for Rocky View Schools in the fall of 2016. The school is situated on traditional Niitsitapi, Nakoda, Tsuu T’ina and Métis territory, also known as Treaty 7 lands from 1877 and Métis Region 3. For thousands of years, the territory has shared knowledge, care and the ancestors of these nations; past, present and future. It is essential to relationships that the recognition of traditional lands and treaties takes place on an ongoing basis. As a new school, we have had our first year to connect with Nations and establish our relationship together.

Each Indigenous Knowledge Keeper had land sites that were important to their Nation and places for the students to develop relationships with. Each site provided a place for understanding and contextualizing knowledge that would be shared with them. These places were generously offered by Knowledge Keepers and became the centre of our planning for visits and sequencing of learning events.

Place-based learning incorporated ceremony, stories and sharing of knowledge. The places where this model of learning took place were:

  • Our classroom
  • Heloise Lorimer School Field
  • Glacial Erratic, Airdrie
  • Kings Heights Pond, Airdrie
  • Nose Hill, Calgary
  • Grotto Canyon, Exshaw
  • Blackfoot Crossing, Siksika

Over 100 students were able to learn with Niitsitapi, Nakoda and Métis Knowledge Keepers. Multi-grade groupings for experiences took place, as well as interdisciplinary learning. The greatest outcome was the relationships that students created. Students found connections to one another amongst their experiences. Guided reflection empowered students to share and have pride in their ideas and knowledge. Furthermore, students gained success in understanding and meeting curriculum objectives related to Language Arts, Science, Mathematics, Physical Education, Art and Social Studies. My grade 3 class was significantly influenced by our collaborative learning opportunities with Indigenous ways of knowing and Indigenous Knowledge Keepers.

Please visit the following website to review our learning together in detail: http://schoolblogs.rockyview.ab.ca/indigenous-land-based-education/.

Welcome Back!

Welcome Back!

Superintendent of Schools – Welcome back for the 2017-2018 school year. I am honoured to be part of Rocky View Schools (RVS) and the team that serves the youth in our communities. I hope everyone had a great summer and enjoyed the amazing weather we had throughout the region.

Over this school year, we will remain focused on ensuring that students experience success, engagement, and support – the three pillars of our Four-Year Plan we remain committed to. We are actively working to help students develop critical literacy and numeracy skills, while building a broad skillset of important competencies that will serve them throughout their lifetime. We achieve this through providing students with rich, hands-on, real-world learning environments both in and outside the classroom, keeping the spark of curiosity and learning alive. We also continue to hold a high value on inclusion, diversity, compassion and fairness and attempt to address the unique needs of every learner through tailored supports specific to the needs of the individual child. Our students deserve no less!

At Rocky View Schools our greatest strength is our people. It is our entire dedicated team that makes a difference in the lives of our students. We are so proud of our staff and the countless things they do for our students and our school communities. A special thank you to many of our staff that worked throughout the summer to get ready for the start of the school year.

We cannot do this alone. We have great community partners and volunteers that amplify our efforts. I want to thank all of those who give their time and resources to help our students. Other critical partners are our parents. Your support and involvement ensure your children, our students, continue to receive rich learning experiences in supportive learning environments.

Together we are stronger and together we can do the very best for our students.

I look forward to a great year ahead.

Greg

Seeing is Believing – Part 2

Seeing is Believing – Part 2

RVS Learning Specialist – Another common theme that we hear about on site visits is the emphasis on relationships. Each school we toured had a different, yet effective way to connect their students, staff, and community. Crescent Heights High School in Medicine Hat has recently started on their High School Redesign journey. Their initial focus has been on building relationships with students and staff and encouraging the pursuit of their passions. Forty minutes each day is set aside for a flex/advisory block that they call “CHAT.” During CHAT, academic, social, and emotional supports are provided. Each student has the chance to connect with an adult in the building, who, along with the supportive peer group, stays as their CHAT connection throughout their time at CHH. One Friday a month they have a day they call “Spark Day.” On this day, during CHAT, students can explore a topic or learn a skill of their choice. Sessions offered range widely, including sports, music, cooking, knitting, computer programing, jellyfish, and many more. The offerings are based on the passions of the staff and the students, and they change regularly. Many schools are experimenting with advisories so it was extremely enlightening to talk to a school about what has been working well and where they are going from here.

In Bassano School, relationships are key. With a high population of students from the Siksika Nation, the school has worked hard to foster relationships within the First Nations community to ensure the success of all students. It is one of very few schools in Alberta that can report no significant achievement differences between their FMNI and non-status students. First Nation students are just as likely to graduate from Bassano as any other student in the school. One of the many ways they have engaged their community is by bringing one of their Parent Teacher Interview nights in to the Siksika community. This demonstration of the school’s commitment to community has lead to substantially higher attendance at these meetings and broader parent involvement in the school.

Bassano School is more than just a building where teaching happens; it is a central hub of the community – a place where kids want to be and where community involvement is high. In their multimedia classes, equipped with green screen and professional lighting, students produce high quality newscasts and advertisements for local businesses and sports teams. The school also has a Human Patient Simulator where students work with nurses from the nearby hospital to check vitals, diagnose, and treat patients with all the authenticity of a medical training facility.

These site visits have all been eye opening. There has been something to learn from each person we’ve been fortunate enough to speak with and each place we’ve been able to explore. Although touring other schools is a great experience, powerful insights don’t necessarily require a road trip. Within every school there are opportunities to discover and stories worthy of hearing. A great first site visit can often be a visit with someone just down the hall or on the other side of your building. Often a powerful professional learning experience can come from simply observing a colleague teach, or being observed by a colleague, and then having a conversation about it. The beauty of being an educator is that we are surrounded by people to collaborate with, to learn from, and who share our goal of wanting to do what’s best for students.

Then again, sometimes it’s tremendously valuable to see other contexts in order to better understand your own. Do you have an initiative you’d like to see in action, or a concept that you’d like to explore remotely? Contact our team to discuss a possible site visit to support that goal.

Seeing really is believing!

 

Appreciating Our RVS Family

Appreciating Our RVS Family

christmas_freelargeSuperintendent of Schools – As the holiday season rapidly approaches I want to take a moment to share my appreciation for the fantastic people that make up Rocky View Schools. I have gained my appreciation by travelling throughout RVS and chatting informally with people, watching the countless tweets showcasing the great things going on in schools, attending community and school events, visiting schools, quiet conversations with students, observing the efforts of our staff, and living in a community within RVS.

What do I see? People who care, people who go above and beyond, people making a positive difference in our communities and with our youth. Whether it is a secretary, teacher, grounds person, education assistant, assistant principal, HR recruiter, afternoon caretaker, community volunteer coach, school tech and countless others – I see people who dedicate themselves to serve others. That is just how we roll in RVS. It is in serving others that we get our greatest rewards.

Our RVS team consistently puts others first. I see staff put students and their families ahead of themselves. I see the products of countless volunteer hours donated to make our schools an amazing place for learning, as well as a warm, welcoming and inclusive environment. I see our staff helping students contribute back to our communities and to the world. I smile with pride when I see our kids volunteering, raising funds for those less fortunate, finding their voice to identify injustice, and/or celebrating all that is right in the world. In most cases, it is with staff’s leadership, guidance, and support that the students are able to demonstrate their own leadership in our global society. Our staff models what it means to serve others.

As we reach the winter break, I want to say “thank you” to our entire RVS family. You make a difference in the lives of children, their families, your colleagues, and your communities. Thank you for all that you do. Thank you for welcoming me back into the RVS family with such kindness and concern for my family. Please be safe over the holiday, take the time to recharge your own batteries and try and do something for yourself and your family over the break.

Greg

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