The Journey to Inclusion

The Journey to Inclusion

Director of Learning Supports – Have you ever read a book that cast a reflection on a part of your life? When I opened One Without the Other, I was introduced to the teaching world of Shelley Moore. It resonated. The students, conversations and meetings described in the book felt familiar. More importantly, the clarity in the work created by Shelley and her students provided a good model on which to reflect upon where we are in RVS on the journey to inclusion. (Please read the book to find out where that is!)

It’s only been about 10 years since large-scale laptop use in schools was implemented. Since that time, the proliferation of digital tools in schools has changed the educational landscape. Only a few short years ago, it was a source of frustration for families and school staff to have to search through binders of visual symbols for students who had no other means of good communication. Today, we are able to condense massive volumes, visuals and text to speech onto the tiniest portable devices. The landscape in schools has moved beyond digital device use as well. However, as dramatically as we have changed, we are stuck in many ways too.

In a way, One Without the Other describes the first competency in an inclusive education system. How do we make inclusion real and authentic for each of us? This is the nature of the work in the Learning Department. The things we are doing and the ways in which we do them is showing promising practice in Rocky View Schools. We are in the beginnings of a new iteration in curriculum design that has the potential to improve how we educate our children in inclusive settings. When I think of the intersects between the work of our design, literacy, learning and diversity specialists, I am brought to the place where the real and authentic becomes apparent once the learning is made purposeful for each of our students. When we work with synergy in our schools and with our parents, then we see inclusive learning in action.

Make a Difference  – Student Leadership  – CSLC 2017

Make a Difference – Student Leadership – CSLC 2017

Director of Learning Services – Next week, a large delegation of high school student leaders and teachers from Rocky View Schools will be descending upon Waterloo, Ontario for the 33rd CSLC (Canadian Student Leadership Conference). This learning and leading event will be life altering for many.

When I think of the learning opportunities I have had as an educator, none is more memorable or remarkable than the career-imprinting event of the first-ever Canadian Student Leadership Conference hosted in Yorkton, Saskatchewan in September 1985. As a ‘wet behind the ears’ brand new teacher with all of three weeks of experience under my belt, I was asked by our assistant principal if I would like to accompany two incredibly accomplished grade 12 leadership students to this event. Without hesitation I said, “Sure!” not realizing that the conference, which 33 years later is now fondly referred to as CSLC (pronounced see-slick), would help define and shape my career in education as a teacher, coach, colleague, learner, administrator, director and community member across multiple jurisdictions.

Our flight out of Edmonton to Regina was exciting ‘back in the day.’ The quick flight was followed by a much lengthier van ride from Regina to Yorkton. In the van we were ‘starstruck’ as conference speakers, Jack Donohue, former Canadian National Men’s Basketball Team coach, and Pamela Wallin, host of CTV’s national morning news show ‘Canada AM’ (and now more infamously recognized as a Canadian Senator), rode with us and told amusing tales the entire ride. We were completely engaged and the conference had not even started.

The excitement and entertainment of the van ride to Yorkton was quickly overshadowed upon arrival at Yorkton Composite High School where Barry Sharpe, the teacher chair for the conference, greeted everyone.  Our threesome was quickly engulfed by the energy exuded by the 800 student and 200 teacher delegates to the inaugural student leadership event. The dream of Barry Sharpe taking what had previously been a provincial conference and elevating it to a national event had been realized, starting a wave of service and leadership development across Canada that continues today.

Over the next five days, student leaders and adult advisors were engrossed in ‘living leadership.’ Through networking sessions, workshops, keynote speakers and team building, we garnered amazing ideas to take back to our schools. We met like-minded, action-oriented people who were committed to ensuring student voice was honored and empowered. The personal and professional connections we made at that first ever conference, have remained strong through 33 years in this work. To this day, CSLC connections such as Dorothy Karlson (SK) and Dave Conlon (ON) remain some of the most profound professional influences and resources in my work as a jurisdictional leader.

It’s kind of like Robert Fulghum said in his book, “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten.” Almost all I really need to know about leading, I learned through student leadership. Certainly, foundations of my philosophy as a school administrator are rooted in my passion for student leadership. The lessons from some of the keynote speakers at that first conference, including Mark Scharenbroich and Alvin Law, are timeless and have guided me as a teacher and administrator throughout my career. “Leave a place better than you found it,” is a mantra to which I subscribe thanks to Mark. Alvin’s ability to confront unimaginable challenges as a thalidomide baby and turn them into opportunities to make the world a better place remains inspiring and humbling.

The hospitality of the community of Yorkton was unparalleled, demonstrating personal, school and community leadership in ways we had never seen. After five days of awe-inspiring, motivational, generous and truly selfless sharing of ideas by compatriots from across this amazing country, our little threesome gratefully and graciously returned home, exhilarated and bursting with ideas to make 1985-86 the ‘best year ever’ at our school. The ‘legacy’ for the students was improved culture and spirit in the school, through the student leadership events they undertook. As a staff member, I explicitly engaged my peers in making our school a ‘great place to learn and work’ with CLSC inspired activities.

Our participating RVS schools can expect some wonderful and energetic ideas to be launched in their own schools this upcoming year, once their student leaders and advisors return from CSLC 2017. We look forward to learning how our newest group of RVS leaders will #makeadifference.

Rocky View Schools:  Always a Leader

Rocky View Schools: Always a Leader

Associate Superintendent of Learning – Rocky View Schools (RVS) has long been considered a high performing school jurisdiction. We develop and maintain research-based practices, models and ideas resulting in positive educational outcomes. Our Four-Year Plan has clear vision, mission and belief statements with corresponding goals and strategies that focus on teaching and learning.

This year we continue to focus on attaining second order change to foster new ways of teaching and learning. How do we do this? By Making it Visible, Making it Real and Making it for Everyone. We provide our teachers and administrators with numerous professional learning opportunities to ensure this direction continues to move forward.

What learning looks like in RVS

Make it Visible – “We believe that when students learn how to learn – that is to acquire, create, connect, and communicate knowledge in a variety of contexts – we are helping them build the confidence and habits of mind to become life-long learners and successful citizens.” Making learning visible addresses how observation and documentation can shape, extend and make visible the student’s individual and group learning. Our students will become self-directed learners who are intrinsically motivated.

Make it Real – By offering authentic learning experiences for our students, we provide the opportunity for deeper, more meaningful learning to take place. We partner real-time, real-world businesses with our students, which can significantly minimize the barriers that typically separate the classroom from the real world. The Building Futures program is just one example of authentic, project-based learning happening at RVS.

Make it for Everyone – We recognize that learning communities can be very diverse. We are committed to designing instruction to ensure the inclusiveness of our classrooms. Teachers are architects of learning and plan to allow for multiple means of expression and representation of student learning.

Check out RVS Learning Stories on our YouTube channel for a closer look at the teaching and learning in our schools!

Welcome Back!

Welcome Back!

Superintendent of Schools – Welcome back for the 2017-2018 school year. I am honoured to be part of Rocky View Schools (RVS) and the team that serves the youth in our communities. I hope everyone had a great summer and enjoyed the amazing weather we had throughout the region.

Over this school year, we will remain focused on ensuring that students experience success, engagement, and support – the three pillars of our Four-Year Plan we remain committed to. We are actively working to help students develop critical literacy and numeracy skills, while building a broad skillset of important competencies that will serve them throughout their lifetime. We achieve this through providing students with rich, hands-on, real-world learning environments both in and outside the classroom, keeping the spark of curiosity and learning alive. We also continue to hold a high value on inclusion, diversity, compassion and fairness and attempt to address the unique needs of every learner through tailored supports specific to the needs of the individual child. Our students deserve no less!

At Rocky View Schools our greatest strength is our people. It is our entire dedicated team that makes a difference in the lives of our students. We are so proud of our staff and the countless things they do for our students and our school communities. A special thank you to many of our staff that worked throughout the summer to get ready for the start of the school year.

We cannot do this alone. We have great community partners and volunteers that amplify our efforts. I want to thank all of those who give their time and resources to help our students. Other critical partners are our parents. Your support and involvement ensure your children, our students, continue to receive rich learning experiences in supportive learning environments.

Together we are stronger and together we can do the very best for our students.

I look forward to a great year ahead.

Greg

Learning is a Journey

Learning is a Journey

Director of 21C Learning -The theme of ‘Education Week’ this year is ‘Learning is a journey.’  As educators, our own journeys began many years ago, as we entered the formal school system as students.  Little did we know then, how our teachers would motivate, challenge, inspire, surprise, and ultimately educate us to take up the mantle of teaching ourselves.

In my own learning journey, my grade one teacher, Mrs. Thain, towered over us, as she inducted our rambunctious class into the expectations of curriculum, socialization, organization and civility as we donned the learners’ role.  In grade six, it was Miss Bilyk, the brand new, hip homeroom teacher whose passion for her learners and learning compelled us to work hard, enjoy reading, get creative and have fun.  Somehow she channeled our boundless energy into meaningful learning experiences that enthralled us. Mrs. Nelson, in grade nine, treated us like the young adults we were so excited to become, engaging us in the civic and provincial election process through current events, making connections between our school and our world.  In grade twelve, whether it was Mr. Rakoz exploring reproductive systems in biology, Mr. Prodaniuk waxing philosophically about ‘Death of a Salesman’ in English or Mr. Seward outlining the merits of various economic and political systems in Social Studies, our teachers were doing their best to shepherd us out of the ‘system’ as well-prepared, soon-to-be, new graduates. That seems an eternity ago, and yet, the enthusiasm, expertise and passion of those teachers ‘back in the day’ holds sway with myself and fellow educators today.

And it wasn’t only those teachers…As a student, I did not fully appreciate the ‘behind the scenes’ work that our school administration also did to support our learning.  It is not surprising how, over time, perspective evolves during one’s own educational journey.  Over the past two weeks in particular, I have been incredibly humbled and inspired by my administrative colleagues – the school based principals and assistant principals who are the lead learners in Rocky View schools.  Their dedication and commitment to learning, learners, the community and the greater good, is remarkable.  As role models, their fidelity to their own learning remains paramount at this time of year, when they simultaneously inhabit the present while preparing and planning for the future, 2017-2018 school year.  Despite their unbelievably busy schedules, they prioritize time for after school Book Clubs, graduate courses, webinars and online learning among other activities.  They continue to support staff and students in their respective learning journeys, celebrating their achievements and bolstering their supports as the learning gets deeper and more demanding.  As lead learners, they are also exceptionally generous with their own ‘best practices’. I have witnessed extraordinary generosity of ideas in multiple contexts, from elementary to high school teams across the jurisdiction. Our RVS administrators orchestrate rich learning for not only their students, but also their staff as they observe and demonstrate, “We are all learners.”

It was Henry Adams who once said, “A teacher affects eternity: he can never tell where his influence stops.”  During Education Week, as we reflect on our own ‘Learning Journeys’ we can thank a teacher or an administrator, for provoking and stimulating our learners’ minds. It is with prodigious gratitude, that I thank those teachers who helped me along my educational path to becoming a teacher.  It is with equal respect, admiration and appreciation, that I work alongside our RVS teacher and administrative colleagues as they continue to illuminate the path of the learning journeys of our students and staff. We will delight in today’s students being motivated, inspired and challenged by their teachers and leaders, as they navigate and enjoy the ‘open road’ of learning.

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