Learning is a Journey

Learning is a Journey

Director of 21C Learning -The theme of ‘Education Week’ this year is ‘Learning is a journey.’  As educators, our own journeys began many years ago, as we entered the formal school system as students.  Little did we know then, how our teachers would motivate, challenge, inspire, surprise, and ultimately educate us to take up the mantle of teaching ourselves.

In my own learning journey, my grade one teacher, Mrs. Thain, towered over us, as she inducted our rambunctious class into the expectations of curriculum, socialization, organization and civility as we donned the learners’ role.  In grade six, it was Miss Bilyk, the brand new, hip homeroom teacher whose passion for her learners and learning compelled us to work hard, enjoy reading, get creative and have fun.  Somehow she channeled our boundless energy into meaningful learning experiences that enthralled us. Mrs. Nelson, in grade nine, treated us like the young adults we were so excited to become, engaging us in the civic and provincial election process through current events, making connections between our school and our world.  In grade twelve, whether it was Mr. Rakoz exploring reproductive systems in biology, Mr. Prodaniuk waxing philosophically about ‘Death of a Salesman’ in English or Mr. Seward outlining the merits of various economic and political systems in Social Studies, our teachers were doing their best to shepherd us out of the ‘system’ as well-prepared, soon-to-be, new graduates. That seems an eternity ago, and yet, the enthusiasm, expertise and passion of those teachers ‘back in the day’ holds sway with myself and fellow educators today.

And it wasn’t only those teachers…As a student, I did not fully appreciate the ‘behind the scenes’ work that our school administration also did to support our learning.  It is not surprising how, over time, perspective evolves during one’s own educational journey.  Over the past two weeks in particular, I have been incredibly humbled and inspired by my administrative colleagues – the school based principals and assistant principals who are the lead learners in Rocky View schools.  Their dedication and commitment to learning, learners, the community and the greater good, is remarkable.  As role models, their fidelity to their own learning remains paramount at this time of year, when they simultaneously inhabit the present while preparing and planning for the future, 2017-2018 school year.  Despite their unbelievably busy schedules, they prioritize time for after school Book Clubs, graduate courses, webinars and online learning among other activities.  They continue to support staff and students in their respective learning journeys, celebrating their achievements and bolstering their supports as the learning gets deeper and more demanding.  As lead learners, they are also exceptionally generous with their own ‘best practices’. I have witnessed extraordinary generosity of ideas in multiple contexts, from elementary to high school teams across the jurisdiction. Our RVS administrators orchestrate rich learning for not only their students, but also their staff as they observe and demonstrate, “We are all learners.”

It was Henry Adams who once said, “A teacher affects eternity: he can never tell where his influence stops.”  During Education Week, as we reflect on our own ‘Learning Journeys’ we can thank a teacher or an administrator, for provoking and stimulating our learners’ minds. It is with prodigious gratitude, that I thank those teachers who helped me along my educational path to becoming a teacher.  It is with equal respect, admiration and appreciation, that I work alongside our RVS teacher and administrative colleagues as they continue to illuminate the path of the learning journeys of our students and staff. We will delight in today’s students being motivated, inspired and challenged by their teachers and leaders, as they navigate and enjoy the ‘open road’ of learning.

Trustees and School Councils Working Together to Serve Students

Trustees and School Councils Working Together to Serve Students

Superintendent of Schools – Last week the Board hosted its second of two annual meetings with School Council executive members. Rocky View’s Board of Trustees values the contributions of its School Councils. School Councils can enhance student learning by engaging parents, staff, and community members to advise the Principal and the Board on matters concerning school improvement planning. The Division views each School Council as a means for parents and community members to work together with the school to support and enhance student learning. These joint meetings are opportunities to network, support the important work of our School Councils, and gather input. Trustees try and attend as many school council meetings in their wards throughout the year as possible.

In our administrative procedure about School Councils (AP110), it highlights a number of important functions and roles. Among many duties, the School Council will have an opportunity to provide advice on the development of the school’s: mission, vision and philosophy; procedures; annual education plan; annual results report, and budget.

In the fall, the joint meeting focused on hearing from Alberta Education staff about the curriculum refresh currently underway. The spring meeting included sharing with School Councils the recently completed three-year capital plan and a showing of the movie Screenagers, an award-winning documentary on mental health, which focuses on the challenges families face given social media, video games, and the internet. Screenagers offers solutions to empower kids to navigate the digital world and maintain a balance between home, school and academics.

We appreciate everyone who joined us for the evening. We know people are busy and have very full schedules. There was plenty of table talk after the movie that was a good sign that people were engaged and found the topic and content of the movie interesting. I know as a parent of a 15 and 11-year-old, some of the parenting strategies we have implemented were reinforced and I learned a few things by watching the movie.

Greg

Trustees – Serving Their Communities

Trustees – Serving Their Communities

Superintendent of Schools – Recently I attended a RVS Advocacy board committee meeting where one of the topics on the agenda was a discussion about how this Board can encourage, help, and support people considering running for trustee in the upcoming elections this fall. It is important to remember that I am not a Board member nor a trustee. A major part of my job is to actually support the Board and one of the ways is through supporting effective governance. I am a strong believer in public education and the important role that trustees have in providing the voice of the community.

The Alberta School Boards Association puts out a variety of materials to support potential trustees prior to each election. Locally, RVS has put out information packages for potential trustees, held an evening session to support candidates, published information about the election. Often people only have a vague idea of what a trustee does so I think it is important for people to gather plenty of information prior to making a decision to run for trustee. I can tell you it is a lot more work than the public two hour meeting every two weeks! Being a trustee is a rewarding opportunity to serve your community and does require dedication. In any given week/month trustees may also: attend committee meetings; attend school council meetings; meet with local government officials and MLAs; work and learn with other trustees in the zone/province; engage in professional learning related to the role; help parents navigate the system; research information; and countless other tasks.

According to the ASBA, “school board trustees are local politicians elected by and accountable to the community they serve. The school board has many responsibilities, including:

  • setting school division goals that ensure students have the knowledge and skills that enable them to be better prepared for life;
  • planning school division priorities based on provincial curriculum requirements, community input, available resources and best practices in education;
  • developing and implementing an annual budget for the school division based on curriculum requirements and strategic priorities;
  • developing policies to guide school division administration and employees toward division goals;
  • ensuring residents of the school division are regularly informed about the work and achievements of the school division;
  • advocating on behalf of the school community to decision-makers and stakeholders on important issues that affect education, and to ensure education is a top public priority;
  • ensuring regular opportunities for public input and access;
  • evaluating the school division’s chief executive officer – the superintendent of schools.”

According to our own RVS policy, here is what the role of a trustee is -> policy 3. Here is a link to information about what the Board does -> policy 2. These documents help provide the big picture view of what is expected of trustees.

If you know someone who is interested in running for in the fall election for a trustee, encourage them to attend a public meeting this spring, check out the ASBA website about the work of trustees and election information, continue to monitor the RVS website for more information, and/or talk to an existing trustee to gather more information. The nomination process will come up quickly in the fall (Sept 18th) so now is the time to think about the opportunity to serve your community by becoming a trustee.

Greg

p.s. As many of you reading this are RVS staff, there is rule which restricts your ability to run for trustee if, on nomination day, you are an employee of any school district, school division, charter school or private school as of nomination day – unless you take an unpaid leave of absence to run before the last working day prior to nomination day.

Amazing Things Our Students Do

Amazing Things Our Students Do

Superintendent of Schools – I am so grateful for the many opportunities my role affords to get to see our RVS students excel, contribute, and make a difference in their communities. Teens especially get a bad rap in our society. Most adults forget what it was like as we transitioned from kids to young adults. We all made mistakes, and the occasional poor choice, but society seems stuck on judging all teens by their mistakes. I’d love to wear the body cam to share just some of the amazing things I get to see kids and teens routinely do.

I saw 75 teens from eight different school give up an evening and full day away from their regular classes to participate in RVS’ Honour Band. The concert band performed for a group of adults and students at Chestermere High as a culminating activity. The teens in the audience watched the concert – many of which probably would not list concert band on their top 10 interest lists – and where incredibly well behaved. They listened intently, recognized the efforts of kids from across the region, and when the concert ended, picked up their chairs and put them back – and then many turned around and grabbed the chairs for the adults in the room.

My twitter feed is consistently full of kids collecting something for those in need in their community, kids participating in basketball and curling playoffs/playdowns, grade 10 students working with grade 2s to share their knowledge and experiences, kids learning with members of our communities, kids teaching people in our communities, teens helping volunteer groups, teens raising funds for those in need both locally and globally, and teens taking on leadership roles within their schools. Watch the #rvsed hashtag or a couple of the schools in your community for a week and I assure you that you will feel a lot better about our communities and country when you see the amazing things our kids are doing.

Lastly, I cannot forget to recognize our amazing RVS staff who empower and enable students to make a difference. Our staff volunteer countless hours, create highly engaging environments, which allow kids to shine. Staff make a conscious effort to have high expectations and build skills so that students can be successful.

Greg

Take Your Kid to Work Day

Take Your Kid to Work Day

Superintendent of Schools – Last week my 14 year old son, JT spent the day at work with me as part of a national Grade 9 campaign entitled, Take Your Kid to Work. Given my work is connected to schools, my kids have a decent idea about what I do, but it was a behind scenes day for JT.

He was excited because he got to wear a shirt and tie just like it was a hockey game. Throughout the day he remained very professional and took the day very seriously. Throughout the Education Centre we had 3 other students attending work with their parent for the day.

I warned him that the day was not planned for him and it will probably be a day full of meetings. The day started with us working on some behind the scenes work on the Ward Boundary Review project that JT pretty much just watched and asked questions about. We then had an hour and a half long briefing style meeting about one of the branches of our Learning Department. We moved right into another meeting about one department’s budget. JT was interested in that meeting because he got to watch a bit about how resources are allocated and some of the challenges when you want to do a number of things but the funds just are not available. He saw us prioritize spending based on the overall student needs.

At one point during the day I had to ask JT to step outside as it was a confidential material, but for the rest of the day he was with me fully. We attended a committee for about an hour that was working on the development of RVS’ new internet site. That was probably his favourite part of the day. The group asked his thoughts on the design because it directly related to students. His day finished with a bit of office work, and then when I headed out for an evening meeting he got to go to his hockey practice.

Since that day he has asked me a couple of follow-up questions about things that were discussed during the day. Overall it was a good opportunity for him to better understand what I do and I really enjoyed having him around for the day.

Greg

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