Integrating the Arts into Learning

Integrating the Arts into Learning

Principal, Elizabeth Barrett Elementary School – Engaging students should be at the forefront of everything we do as educators. We know that once students are engaged, learning is more likely to be alive and fluid. There is nothing more energizing than seeing children’s eyes light up and the excitement is contagious.

In addressing the 21st Century Competencies, such as critical thinking, collaborative learning and environmental stewardship, our current students are empowered to make differences in our world, with a consciousness of the positive impact they will have on our world.

Sharing student learning through the arts in an effective way of engaging learners. Our students are advocates for the arts. We are proud of their voices to provide leadership and sharing their work through the arts. The following link describes how the University of Calgary is connecting the importance of integrating the arts into elevating students’ consciousness of learning. http://tinyurl.com/rvsebspherald

We know enabling our students to self-reflect and become self-reliant learners is powerful. Reflecting on their learning and feeling confident is critical to becoming a lifelong learner. The article in the following link highlights one means by which students have been doing this at Elizabeth Barrett School by integrating the arts into their learning. http://tinyurl.com/rvsebsp1

We are in an exciting era of learning. Setting our students up to be successful is at the heart of what we do. Personal engagement of their learning is paramount to success. Being a part of this journey is a privilege.

 

Talking With My Kids

Talking With My Kids

Superintendent of Schools – Like many families, my family is a very busy family with everyone hustling to different events. In the fall and winter my family is consumed with hockey. Hockey practices, games, skating on the pond, skating treadmill appointment, hockey fundraising activities, getting skates sharpened, weekend tournaments, checking out the latest gear, spring hockey tryouts, etc. The same can be said for most families, but you can substitute soccer, basketball, dance, swimming, piano, language learning, skiing, dirt biking, 4-H, sledding, etc. for hockey.

It is challenging because it seems like all activities are asking youngsters and families to commit to only one activity. Specialization is commonplace and the days of kids playing multiple sports, while skiing recreationally and learning the piano are gone. Now that said, we are guilty as we allow ourselves and kids to get sucked up into the vortex of hockey in the fall & winter and baseball in the spring & summer.

Despite the busy schedule, we try and make the time to eat together most evenings. It remains the best opportunity for us to have conversations, check in with each other, and see what else is going on in our lives. I’ve recently engaged in another opportunity for discussions with the boys, the captive audience hockey road trip.

As we have two boys typically heading off in different directions for hockey, we have to divide and conquer. Both of the last two weekends I’ve been out of town with one of the boys at different hockey tournaments / away games. The drive to and from the event provided me the opportunity to talk with my boys. My car is the low-tech vehicle in the family, so there is no TV, videos, satellite radio, Xbox and Wi-Fi to distract us. This past weekend we listened to a story on CBC about the US election and it spurred a great conversation about democracy, political organizing, voter turnout, media, and more. We would not have had that conversation if not traveling in a car for an extended period. The previous weekend, as we drove down Hwy 2, it was talking about ranching, which neither my youngest nor I know much about. We were engaged in a conversation based on what we saw while driving. It was a place-conscious inquiry project where we just talked and on a few occasions had my son open up my phone to find out some information that furthered the conversation. Visiting towns that are new to us provides more opportunity to talk about what industries are in that town and why, the age of the hockey rink, and why it is where it is, how we develop an appreciation for things that are different and so much more.

We are fortunate that friends of ours always volunteer to drive their kid and their kid’s friends to and from events. The kids are older and often it means going out on a Saturday night at 11 pm (or later) to pick up a group of kids. I asked them why they do it and they told me, just like my hockey road trips, it creates an opportunity to talk and learn about what is going on in their kids’ lives and the lives of their friends. No need to stalk their Instagram account or SnapChats, the kids talk in the car. The adult can ask questions and while their own child typically rolls their eyes, other kids in the car will chime in and respond. They describe it as a direct pipeline into the lives of their kids.

So, the next time you are heading out to drive the kids somewhere, take the long route, turn off the radio (or put it on CBC), pretend you forgot the phone charger, and see where the conversation takes you.

Greg

‘Tails’ from a Raccoon

‘Tails’ from a Raccoon

rockyOfficial Mascot (Re-post from Feb 2012) – When I was first approached to tell the story of how I came to be Rocky View Schools’ official mascot, I have to say that I was completely honoured and a little bit nervous. I had never written a blog before (although my paws are pretty dexterous, it’s hard to type without opposable thumbs), but I was up to the challenge! I think it’s safe to say that I’m the first Raccoon to have written a blog. Then again, as the mascot for RVS, I have probably done a few other things that Raccoons don’t usually get to do!

I got my start as a mascot thanks to Lance Rinehart, RVS’ Facilities Assistant, a very close friend of mine. Back in 2008, Lance had one of those light bulb-over-the-head kind of ideas: Rocky View Schools needed its very own division mascot. He did some research and then presented his idea to RVS’ Superintendent of Schools Greg Bass, who thought it was a great suggestion.

Shortly thereafter, Superintendent Bass presented Lance’s idea to the Board of Trustees who agreed that a mascot was just what RVS needed! Instead of the jurisdiction choosing the mascot, RVS created a contest for students to submit their best ideas. A small selection committee was struck and boy did they ever have their work cut out for them! After going through many creative entries, Rocky Raccoon was born based on a drawing submitted by a Grade 4 student named Ryan McHarg from Indus Elementary. Rocky Raccoon was officially introduced to the jurisdiction August 26, 2008 as part of RVS’ new brand.

As a mascot, I am RVS’ unofficial Ambassador responsible for bringing passion and goodwill to the entire jurisdiction. Being larger than life, I attract all kinds of attention and apparently I have created quite the presence in the community. One of the best parts of my job is when people tell me how much they love to see me at their school or their event and how my being there makes their day just a bit brighter.

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Another great thing about being a mascot is getting to meet so many wonderful people from all around the RVS community. Rocky View has so many fine young students and staff members that it makes me proud to be their mascot. Not only to do I get to meet them, but I also get to meet their families! Over the past few years, I’ve also got to meet local and provincial politicians and even the Calgary Flames Alumni Hockey Team – not too shabby for a Raccoon!

Since starting at Rocky View, I have really built up my resume. New skills include riding unicycles and scooters in parades, skating and playing hockey with students and teachers, climbing playground equipment, and participating in other sporting activities! I may not do everything as well as some of the students, but I always manage to bring smiles to the faces of everyone I see and meet. I am a pretty good dancer though and I certainly have gotten a few people up on their feet during an event or an assembly!

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If you haven’t guessed yet, I love my job as official mascot. I cannot say enough good things about the students and staff at Rocky View Schools. No matter where I go, whether it’s out to the schools or into the community, there is always at least one person that I can make smile or feel special and this reminds me why I do what I do and why it’s all so worthwhile. I love being apart of Rocky View and I can’t wait to see each and every one of you soon! I have made my mark here and it’s just going to get bigger with your support!

rocky5

 

 

Girls in Technology!

Girls in Technology!

RVS Learning Specialist – Friday November 18th was a fantastic day at the Education Centre in RVS! There were BB-8 robots whizzing around the room, bots making art, virtual reality rollercoaster trips, coding, and paper airplanes that could carry cargo.

Teachers and students from around our jurisdiction met to discuss the lack of girls and young women represented in STEAM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) in our schools. Even though it is 2016, statistics show that girls and boys are still choosing career paths that they feel are “gender appropriate”. Participants of the day were able to talk with young women to hear what it’s like to be a woman in STEAM in the real world. We spoke with Stephanie Campbell, an engineer at Google, who has found herself in meetings with 50 people and has been the only female in the room. That doesn’t stop her from innovating and creating incredible things. Maddie and Kedra from the WISE (Women in Science and Engineering) program at the U of C talked about supporting women in programs that have been traditionally dominated by men. Our RVS girls asked great questions like “What did you like to do when you were my age?” and “What advice would you give your younger self?” The girls came away with the knowledge that if you are curious and fascinated by STEAM, don’t be discouraged if you aren’t an expert. You will be successful if you know how to learn.

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It warmed the cockles of my heart to see a grade 3 girl struggle with getting her paper airplane to carry popsicles. She redesigned her plane several times and made a lot of test flights. By the end of the day it flew 3 metres, while carrying 10 popsicle sticks! She told me the secret was to make sure the sticks were even on each side. Another girl made an art-bot that drew circles. Her design was based on a toboggan because she thought sleds are slippery and she wanted her art bot to slide around the page, instead of vibrate or jump.

20161118_133044What the adults in the room came away with is that girls are inventors, designers and creators. When certain pressures or influences are removed, such as competitiveness, and they are just allowed to play, they will use iterative processes to make innovative creations. None of the girls gave up on things, even when they were frustrated. A certain secretary who couldn’t get her art bot to work, took it back to her desk to keep redesigning. Over lunch people near her work station could hear it buzzing. She was thrilled with her accomplishment and showed me her bot generated art.

Teachers and students are pushing ahead in the coming weeks to implement projects, clubs and initiatives that will encourage more girls in STEAM. Ask around your school to see what you are doing to support girls. The problems of today and the future will be solved by people in STEAM. Let’s make sure that we are providing opportunities for everyone to be exposed to STEAM at young ages, so they can discover if that is what they are interested in, without the background noise of what is “gender appropriate”.

 

 

Building Our Students Futures!

Building Our Students Futures!

Building Futures Teacher – “It’s not about the house!” It is what I say to visitors all the time about the Building Futures program, where 34 grade 10 students spend the whole school year in a double garage working side-by-side with McKee Homes amazing sub-contractors to build beautiful homes, all while learning their core classes. If it is not about introducing students to the construction industry, then what is it about?

img_4698My partner teacher, Erica Rozema, and I are in the pursuit of creating learning experiences that matter, ones that try to help build a student’s future. Connecting students to their community has been a major component of this pursuit over the years. Students have been involved in putting on their own fundraising events, they built and set-up little free libraries in Airdrie, donated a book barn to the Airdrie Recycling Center and helped set up the Airdrie Festival of Lights – all in the name of giving back to their community.

This continuous pursuit to connect our students to their community is a driving factor in what we think makes learning experiences matter. Connecting with other humans from all different backgrounds, connecting to the place you live, connecting to ideas that impact our world, connecting to experiences that bring students a sense that they belong. I do admit one of the better “connections” we offer students is the experience of learning to belong in building a most basic need, a home. The construction journey is just one of the learning experiences we have created. We have other learning experiences that have connected students to starting a business, a challenge to create the staging and sales write-up of the homes, re-designing urban spaces, creating a marketing plan for an innovative program and building a solar-powered tiny house. These experiences are because of local experts whom we connected with in the Airdrie community who shared their expertise and feedback with our students.

img_5917Building our student’s futures means that we keep pushing ourselves as teachers to connect learning beyond our “classroom”. It means that we push ourselves to connect learning to people who want to share their knowledge with our students. It means we want to push ourselves to connect learning to a student’s sense of place and allowing them to see themselves as contributors to their community. It means that we push ourselves to connect learning to having students fall in love with the world around them. It means we push ourselves to connect learning so that our students, at the end of the school year, can say “it is not about the house, it is about connecting!”

 


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