Feeding the World in 2050

Feeding the World in 2050

Vienna and Sydney, WG Murdoch School Students – How in the world will we feed 9 Billion people in the year 2050?  The Airdrie / Crossfield 4H Helping Hands Club went on an eye opening field trip Saturday, Jan. 21, to Journey 2050 and we think everyone needs to hear this message!

As the population pushes up to 9 Billion by the year 2050, will it be possible to produce enough food to feed everyone? This was the key question posed to our Airdrie /Crossfield Helping Hands 4H Club members who attended the Journey 2050 Educational Session sponsored by Agrium currently set up at the Agrium Western Event Centre at the Calgary Stampede grounds.

This engaging five-hour program is being offered to school groups, 4H groups and more from all over the Calgary Region. The goal is to teach students about how important jobs and roles in agriculture will be, and what they might look like, as the world braces for the reality that we will need to produce 65% more food from the current land and water base. Is that even going to be possible? What will it require? Our 4H group was lead through a guided conversation around these concepts with the instructors who taught the day long program through games and interactive challenges.

The activities placed in front of our members helping them learn about farming and food production practices around the world today and how agriculture is going to become even more important as an industry as the population grows. It was a great chance to learn from experts, and work alongside other 4H members from all over the Calgary region.

We personally will be in our 40s in the year 2050. How will our diet compare in 2050 with what we enjoy now? Our members discussed the importance of balancing environmental, social and economic issues as the world tackles the key question of what we will all have to do to secure food production for 9 billion.

Crops will likely need to change, we will need to find ways to put lands like swamps and mountainous terrain into use for rice production and grazing animals like goats that can adapt to rocky outcrops for grazing space. We will also need to preserve the current supply of farmable land and not mow it over with urban sprawl.

Our club members left the session feeling the weight of this challenging issue. We found ourselves talking about what we can do now to 1. Reduce our personal food waste, 2. Eat and consume sustainably, 3. Monitor and reduce our personal water use, 4. And how we can reduce our environmental footprint. This is only a small number of topics and questions posed in this day-long session. Our club members are very grateful for the chance to learn more about this important environmental question – we hope everyone in the Rocky View region will attend Journey 2050 while it is in Calgary and we would encourage classrooms and 4H clubs from around Rocky View to consider checking it out!

Big thanks to our 4H friends in the Flatlands for organizing a 4H day at Journey 2050. More information is available online at Journey2050.com

 

‘Tails’ from a Raccoon

‘Tails’ from a Raccoon

rockyOfficial Mascot (Re-post from Feb 2012) – When I was first approached to tell the story of how I came to be Rocky View Schools’ official mascot, I have to say that I was completely honoured and a little bit nervous. I had never written a blog before (although my paws are pretty dexterous, it’s hard to type without opposable thumbs), but I was up to the challenge! I think it’s safe to say that I’m the first Raccoon to have written a blog. Then again, as the mascot for RVS, I have probably done a few other things that Raccoons don’t usually get to do!

I got my start as a mascot thanks to Lance Rinehart, RVS’ Facilities Assistant, a very close friend of mine. Back in 2008, Lance had one of those light bulb-over-the-head kind of ideas: Rocky View Schools needed its very own division mascot. He did some research and then presented his idea to RVS’ Superintendent of Schools Greg Bass, who thought it was a great suggestion.

Shortly thereafter, Superintendent Bass presented Lance’s idea to the Board of Trustees who agreed that a mascot was just what RVS needed! Instead of the jurisdiction choosing the mascot, RVS created a contest for students to submit their best ideas. A small selection committee was struck and boy did they ever have their work cut out for them! After going through many creative entries, Rocky Raccoon was born based on a drawing submitted by a Grade 4 student named Ryan McHarg from Indus Elementary. Rocky Raccoon was officially introduced to the jurisdiction August 26, 2008 as part of RVS’ new brand.

As a mascot, I am RVS’ unofficial Ambassador responsible for bringing passion and goodwill to the entire jurisdiction. Being larger than life, I attract all kinds of attention and apparently I have created quite the presence in the community. One of the best parts of my job is when people tell me how much they love to see me at their school or their event and how my being there makes their day just a bit brighter.

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Another great thing about being a mascot is getting to meet so many wonderful people from all around the RVS community. Rocky View has so many fine young students and staff members that it makes me proud to be their mascot. Not only to do I get to meet them, but I also get to meet their families! Over the past few years, I’ve also got to meet local and provincial politicians and even the Calgary Flames Alumni Hockey Team – not too shabby for a Raccoon!

Since starting at Rocky View, I have really built up my resume. New skills include riding unicycles and scooters in parades, skating and playing hockey with students and teachers, climbing playground equipment, and participating in other sporting activities! I may not do everything as well as some of the students, but I always manage to bring smiles to the faces of everyone I see and meet. I am a pretty good dancer though and I certainly have gotten a few people up on their feet during an event or an assembly!

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If you haven’t guessed yet, I love my job as official mascot. I cannot say enough good things about the students and staff at Rocky View Schools. No matter where I go, whether it’s out to the schools or into the community, there is always at least one person that I can make smile or feel special and this reminds me why I do what I do and why it’s all so worthwhile. I love being apart of Rocky View and I can’t wait to see each and every one of you soon! I have made my mark here and it’s just going to get bigger with your support!

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Connected Learning = A Whole New World!

Connected Learning = A Whole New World!

RVS Teacher, Langdon School – Students from Langdon School recently had the opportunity to learn Japanese from a group of students in Honolulu, Hawaii. This wonderful opportunity was facilitated by Verena Roberts, a Technology Specialist with Rocky View Schools, and partner teacher Melvina Kurashige of the Mid-Pacific Institute. Interestingly, this connected learning opportunity began through our conversations on Twitter.

I had initially made some assumptions regarding this experience. I had assumed that it would be interesting and engaging for students to connect with peers from another country. I also had assumed that the work presented by students would be of a high quality, as they were presenting to a genuine audience. What actually occurred far exceeded my expectations; and that takes us back to 1998…

Before Instagram, and Twitter, and Facebook, and even MSN Messenger, there was ICQ Chat. I remember a classmate in high school telling me about this new program. He mentioned something along the lines of “yeah, this program is so cool, you can add your friends and talk to a bunch of people all at the same time”.

My initial reaction was disbelief. Was it truly possible to connect with multiple friends online at the same time? I eagerly rushed home and began using ICQ. To this day, I vividly remember the telltale “uh-oh” sound which accompanied an incoming message. At the time, I didn’t think of ICQ as a way of learning. I thought of it simply as a means of communication.

As I reflect upon this as an educator, it becomes clear that, although I was communicating with others, I also was learning about others. I would learn the score of the basketball game that night, or what one of my friends had for supper (Doreen Rowe’s Lasagna is fantastic, by the way). What fascinates me about this process as an educator, is that as technology has advanced, so has the ability to connect with others.

What if students were eager to rush to class, just as I had rushed home, to connect with and learn about others? What if students asked genuine questions to their peers in another country regarding their lives? What if these simple connections could break through barriers and help students to develop empathy for one another? What if this act of connecting could be a simple, yet effective method, as educators, to help students to genuinely understand and celebrate our differences and similarities???

…back to 2016. When my students connected recently with the Hawaiian students via a Google Hangout, many of these questions were answered. Watching students become more globally aware, while learning new content, has opened my perspective regarding connected learning. Students were learning content while also learning about one another. In this sense, they were more than just globally aware, they were entering a whole new world that involved becoming active global citizens, one step at a time.

The next step for my students in the connected learning journey involves the creation of Science games. The games will be shared with students in other countries as a genuine audience. This project has been supported by a community of practitioners through the Gamifi_ED2 project. Working with such a knowledgeable and supportive team is highly beneficial in supporting our students. I look forward to continued connected learning opportunities where students will connect with their peers internationally.

Building Our Students Futures!

Building Our Students Futures!

Building Futures Teacher – “It’s not about the house!” It is what I say to visitors all the time about the Building Futures program, where 34 grade 10 students spend the whole school year in a double garage working side-by-side with McKee Homes amazing sub-contractors to build beautiful homes, all while learning their core classes. If it is not about introducing students to the construction industry, then what is it about?

img_4698My partner teacher, Erica Rozema, and I are in the pursuit of creating learning experiences that matter, ones that try to help build a student’s future. Connecting students to their community has been a major component of this pursuit over the years. Students have been involved in putting on their own fundraising events, they built and set-up little free libraries in Airdrie, donated a book barn to the Airdrie Recycling Center and helped set up the Airdrie Festival of Lights – all in the name of giving back to their community.

This continuous pursuit to connect our students to their community is a driving factor in what we think makes learning experiences matter. Connecting with other humans from all different backgrounds, connecting to the place you live, connecting to ideas that impact our world, connecting to experiences that bring students a sense that they belong. I do admit one of the better “connections” we offer students is the experience of learning to belong in building a most basic need, a home. The construction journey is just one of the learning experiences we have created. We have other learning experiences that have connected students to starting a business, a challenge to create the staging and sales write-up of the homes, re-designing urban spaces, creating a marketing plan for an innovative program and building a solar-powered tiny house. These experiences are because of local experts whom we connected with in the Airdrie community who shared their expertise and feedback with our students.

img_5917Building our student’s futures means that we keep pushing ourselves as teachers to connect learning beyond our “classroom”. It means that we push ourselves to connect learning to people who want to share their knowledge with our students. It means we want to push ourselves to connect learning to a student’s sense of place and allowing them to see themselves as contributors to their community. It means that we push ourselves to connect learning to having students fall in love with the world around them. It means we push ourselves to connect learning so that our students, at the end of the school year, can say “it is not about the house, it is about connecting!”

 


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