The Joys of Yardwork

The Joys of Yardwork

Superintendent of Schools – Like many of our RVS team, I spent some time away from work last week during RVS’ spring break. After spending a few days back in Saskatchewan celebrating a family milestone, we loaded up the van and returned home. I spent the good part of the next four days in the backyard landscaping. I have no green thumb, but shoveling, pushing the wheelbarrow, and installing edging is right up my alley. The immediate feedback of moving four cubic yards of garden mix from the front driveway to various beds in the backyard works for me. Like many challenges, at the beginning I thought we’d never get that all moved. Wheelbarrow full after wheelbarrow full and the pile was not changing. Suddenly I noticed the pile looked a bit smaller. A few loads later, it was smaller yet. A couple of loads later we were scraping the driveway to fill the last load. Wow, mission accomplished.

The next day it was three cubic yards of wood chips. The race was on. How fast can we move those light wood chips? 40 minutes – start to finish and that project was complete. We had time to tackle other pieces of the yard. The next day included three cubic yards of rock on the driveway. So much for another 40-minute job. The weight of the rock combined with my 15-year-old being at an umpiring clinic meant we labored away for 4 hours. Nevertheless, at the end of that day, all the major landscaping groundwork was complete. Now we are ready for the fun bits of planting trees, shrubs, and flowers.

By now you must be wondering, what is Greg writing about all this for? I guess my work is normally focused on the long game: next year’s budget; long-term student achievement growth; multi-year plans; and, creating the conditions for our staff to be successful. Looking back, this project was still about creating the conditions for future plantings to grow (which is not far off from my usual job). It was nice to tackle some tasks that had a defined start and end. I knew the tasks were complete when the piles were moved. I knew I was successful when the yard looked like what we drew up on our garden plan.

Sometimes it is just nice to have a sense of accomplishment with tangible results you can see from your deck!

Greg

The Exhibition Showcase… it all comes together!

The Exhibition Showcase… it all comes together!

RVS Teacher, Prairie Waters Elementary – Part 4 of 4: The culmination of the Grade 5 Exhibition is the community and school showcase. Students have dedicated nine weeks to get to this exciting point in their inquiry. It’s an opportunity to share and celebrate their learning journey not only through Exhibition, but also their journey through the Primary Years Programme at Prairie Waters.

The showcase is a chance for students to take their knowledge and new ideas and share it with a wider audience. Rather than rely on the recall of facts, students are encouraged to engage in a conversation with guests about their issue. Being knowledgeable about their topic is important and it can be communicated in various ways. Students can share what they learned during site visits and interviews and communicate big take-aways they gained, as well as provide information they found relevant during their research.

To prepare for the Exhibition showcase, students brainstorm within their groups to determine how they can entice visitors to enter into a conversation. It could be a piece of artwork, a hands-on activity, a quote or an artifact related to their issue. Students also can speak about the action they took or plan to take. Ultimately while speaking, we hope that students encourage guests to stop and think about the issue and maybe, just maybe, they too will take action or gain a new perspective. Students also engage in conversation by preparing questions to ask their audience and communicate how their points of view have changed about the issue. Finally, students need to know their topic to answer questions from guests.

Students are free to choose the format for their showcase. However teachers do give them a few suggestions. The first is to keep their environmental impact to a minimum. Rather than giving out fliers or information sheets, students could direct their audience to a website they created. The second suggestion is to consider their audience. The community showcase visitors consist mostly of parents and community members. The school showcase invites students ranging from Grade 1 to Grade 4. Conversations students have with adults will look and sound differently than a conversation they might have with a peer.

The last week of Exhibition is a flurry of preparation, excitement, and nerves. Students continue to reflect after the showcase. They identify areas of success and growth and are given the chance to assess their skills as a learner. The entire Exhibition process is a memorable experience for everyone. Students should feel extremely proud of their accomplishments regardless of where they are in their learning journey.

If you are able to join us for the Exhibition showcase, please do. The community showcase takes place on May 3rd from 5:45pm – 7:15pm. The school showcase takes place on May 4th from 8:30am – 10:00am. If you’re unable to join us, follow us on Twitter. Our hashtag is #pwex17.

#pwex17 Invite
Who Are You? What Is Your Story?

Who Are You? What Is Your Story?

RVS Teacher, Ecole Edwards -The story of our beautiful Canada 150 Identity quilt starts with an old photograph. As the 2016-2017 school year was about to begin, and I began to review the Grade 5 program, I decided I wanted to share my learning about my Metis identity with my students. I realized that I could use my voice to ensure that my students would learn about an FNMI perspective through engaging programming.

While I researched resources for Social Studies, I was reminded of a recent visit to my parents’ place in Edmonton with my daughter. We usually have lunch sitting on the back deck in the warm summer sun. After all the greeting hugs and the delicious food, we begin our family visit. During these times we
usually talk about what is happening in our lives, tell stories, tease one another, and laugh. On this particular visit, my daughter was talking about her newest learning as a humanities student focusing on Indigenous Women in Canada. Mom brought out all the vintage photos in their collection and with that a photograph of my Great Great Grandmother, Angele Chalifoux (nee Delorme dit Lemay). Dad’s Metis ancestry is something that my Daughter and I share a keen interest in. In the photo, Angele is a beautiful Indigenous woman sitting proudly with her mustached third husband George Chalifoux. Behind them is a rough sawn log cabin with rifles adorning the exterior walls. The photograph is striking. Both my daughter and I were immediately smitten.

Old family photo

Upon researching Angele’s life through online archival research, I came to learn that prior to this particular photo being taken, she was in fact one of the infamous Edmonton Stragglers. She was one of 84 band members, mostly single women and their children who were struck from Treaty in 1877 by Timothy P. Wadsworth an “Indian Agent” negotiating the relocation of Papaschase reserve- for not being a close enough relative to Chief Papaschase. As a result, Angele left Treaty and applied for Half-Breed (Metis) Scrip, refunding the government $47 worth of Treaty payments. Angele was widowed, starving and supporting her children on her own. Being struck from Treaty made it next to impossible for her to survive, without a “reserve” community to rely on, therefore she assumed a new identity through the “half-breed” commission. All of this information was new to my family. While Angele was a familiar person in a photo, she also had a story, and a fleeting identity. A story that is well documented by government records, yet a story we didn’t know.

I thought about my connection to this information, and how it had affected the identities of my family members before me, and how it will affect the identity of those after me, and ultimately how it affects my identity now. I also considered how I came to know this. I had to search for it, I had to do the work to learn about this history. At no time in my formal schooling was there a focus on the perspective of the FNMI population and history in Alberta. My Father was taught to be ashamed of his Metis ancestry and identity. He told me that I didn’t have to tell anyone about it when we researched and engaged our Metis membership.

Any knowledge of the Metis in Alberta was not taught to me by formal school history, but through a strong connection to the land and an oral history. Fortunately, my father has always lived with a very close connection to the land. He taught us to appreciate and utilize the natural world in a respectful way. At school, I was the only 13-year-old girl who had experienced handling a hunting rifle and hunting knife, shooting and skinning an animal, and then consuming it. Dad taught us about trapping; showing us his father’s rusty old traps and pelt stretchers. My Grandfather, a trilingual man, would regale us with legends of the Whiskey Jack, tell us stories about his trap line, and talk of his days as a fiddler.

To develop an authentic understanding of a FMNI perspective, I started the journey by carefully selecting a number of historical novels written by Indigenous Canadian authors for my daily read aloud time. My first pick was Margaret Pokiak-Fenton’s Fatty Legs. A story about an Inuit girl’s experience in a residential school. Students were hooked after the first chapter! We also read historical fiction about the other important groups of people existing and surviving in Canada pre and post Confederation who also suffered oppression and hardship. Many books were written from the perspective of a child in the context of hardship, collaboration and problem solving. We also looked closely at archival photos of the First People in Alberta and Canada, and the assortment of immigrant groups to help develop a context for students to make a connection to the past by comparing it to today. Learners connected strongly to the idea that their identity, like Angele’s, is ever evolving.

This rich content led to exquisite conversations and naturally scaffolded activities for highly motivating writing experiences connecting the qualities of the people of the past, the present and the future. Many students have developed a taste for historical learning and thinking far beyond my imagination. As a culminating activity we decided to make a quilt to tell the stories of Canada in the past and the present using symbols to portray the identities of important groups of people in Canadian history. Each child carefully chose a symbol to represent their identity as a young Canadian at this point in time, these are included on the quilt. Students insisted that I include my identity as a Metis person on the quilt, I chose an infinity symbol. Lastly, each physical region of Canada is represented by a symbol on the quilt.

It is the student’s wishes that our quilt is given to a child in need. Our quilt tells the varied stories of the people of Canada pieced together with a common thread of collaboration. We are currently searching for an agency that will ensure that our quilt is delivered to a child who deserves warmth, happiness, joy, hope, comfort inspiration and security. It is our hope that this quilt will deliver those things and so will our community. In my heart, I hope this child has a mother like Angele Delorme dit Lemay; a strong, determined, resilient woman.Canada 150 Quilt

Trustees and School Councils Working Together to Serve Students

Trustees and School Councils Working Together to Serve Students

Superintendent of Schools – Last week the Board hosted its second of two annual meetings with School Council executive members. Rocky View’s Board of Trustees values the contributions of its School Councils. School Councils can enhance student learning by engaging parents, staff, and community members to advise the Principal and the Board on matters concerning school improvement planning. The Division views each School Council as a means for parents and community members to work together with the school to support and enhance student learning. These joint meetings are opportunities to network, support the important work of our School Councils, and gather input. Trustees try and attend as many school council meetings in their wards throughout the year as possible.

In our administrative procedure about School Councils (AP110), it highlights a number of important functions and roles. Among many duties, the School Council will have an opportunity to provide advice on the development of the school’s: mission, vision and philosophy; procedures; annual education plan; annual results report, and budget.

In the fall, the joint meeting focused on hearing from Alberta Education staff about the curriculum refresh currently underway. The spring meeting included sharing with School Councils the recently completed three-year capital plan and a showing of the movie Screenagers, an award-winning documentary on mental health, which focuses on the challenges families face given social media, video games, and the internet. Screenagers offers solutions to empower kids to navigate the digital world and maintain a balance between home, school and academics.

We appreciate everyone who joined us for the evening. We know people are busy and have very full schedules. There was plenty of table talk after the movie that was a good sign that people were engaged and found the topic and content of the movie interesting. I know as a parent of a 15 and 11-year-old, some of the parenting strategies we have implemented were reinforced and I learned a few things by watching the movie.

Greg

Making a Documentary

Making a Documentary

RVS Teacher, Prairie Waters Elementary – Part 2 of 4:  As Jen Friske outlined in Part 1 out of 4 in this blogging series, What is the Exhibition, Prairie Waters students in grade 5 participate in a unique 8-9 week, in-depth collaborative inquiry into an issue or problem of their own selection. This project is a culmination of the Primary Years Programme (PYP) and gives a chance for students to demonstrate all of their attained knowledge thus far, as well as challenge them to go further in their learning. All five elements of the PYP will be on display during this inquiry: Attitudes, Knowledge, Key Concepts, Skills and Action.

As with all large student-initiated inquiries, naturally we wanted to capture the process of this wonderful student learning, but how? Fortunately for us, wonderful members of the RVS 21st learning specialists team were available to help us out with their expertise. Spending a day with Janelle Fortmuller allowed us to storyboard two different documentaries that we will focus on during the 9 weeks that will help visualize the students’ journeys. With a purposeful and deliberate attempt to capture learning each week, along with making room for the impromptu moments of learning, we hope these documentary storyboards assist us in making our learning visible.

Our first documentary will focus on the Exhibition in its’ entirety and the Exhibition as a whole process. From the first week of capturing students’ excitements and explanations of their topic, to identifying various self-management, communication, social, thinking and research skills used weekly, we dedicate each Thursday and Friday to capturing student voice about the process via weekly reflections. These powerful snippets of video allow students to tell their story as they go through the process, with the hope of capturing all of the A-Has’ and frustrations experienced by students, to be put together in a process of Exhibition documentary.

Our second documentary arose from the idea of educating parents and guests during the two Exhibition days of May 3rd and 4th. In the year’s past, we’ve urged the parents and guests to challenge students during the Exhibition to have a conversation about their learning and process they went through. As some teachers are aware, urging parents and guests to participate more can be more powerful when it comes directly from students rather than our teacher voice. We wanted to build on last year’s marginal success of a student created video that involved students urging parents to challenge them, to question them, to have a conversation with them. This documentary was influenced by Janelle’s insights as well and our storyboard has more clarity and purpose that builds off of last year’s success.

Along with making our daily learning as visible as possible through our Exhibition Blog and Twitter #pwex17, we hope our two documentaries open the doors to anyone within our division and beyond to see the growth and learning that occurs during the Exhibition and one of their final pieces of their PYP education.