It All Starts Somewhere

It All Starts Somewhere

Superintendent of Schools – For me it was a teaching assignment at Mount Royal Collegiate in Saskatoon. I actually had one more class to take over the summer before graduating but I got a job teaching. It was only going to be a one-year teaching assignment while the regular teacher I would be replacing was covering for someone else who was away on a year-long leave. That morphed into spending 22 of the next 25 years working in the public education space. One year I worked in the private sector (wanted to see what life was like in the “real world”) and two years working in the post-secondary sector.

Last week I was very lucky to be able to help out at the RVS booth at the recent University of Calgary career fair. For three hours, I spoke to prospective teachers who were graduating this spring from the U of C. I had the opportunity to brag about the great things going on in RVS, what drew me to RVS (twice), and how we support our early career teachers. I answered questions about how people can apply and what prospects look like. I must say it was great to be at the RVS booth as we had a steady stream of students interested in what we have to offer. Thanks to Meghan, Shannon, and Roel for letting me join all of you.

The following night I had the pleasure of attending the ATA induction ceremony for over 100 teachers who are part of the RVS family and are either new to the profession or new to Alberta. I wish I could have stayed for the full evening but it was a chance to say a few words and get to learn about many of our new teachers. Each school created a short video to help introduce the new teachers. These videos were quite amazing and kept the crowd laughing. I’ve asked for the DVD so I can watch the other half of videos I missed. Key messages I shared with the group (but also apply to our entire RVS team): we are in this together and on the same team; keep learning and growing; okay to take risks and innovate; collaborate with others; invest in yourself; take care of yourself; and thank those who helped get you here!

In that spirit – thanks to Mr. Richard Turcotte who was my grade 6 teacher and teacher-coaches Dan Boyer, Al Andrie, and Ivan Tam who made such a positive impact on my life. I am a teacher today because of all of you.

Greg

Stomping Out Stigma Related to Talking About Mental Health

Stomping Out Stigma Related to Talking About Mental Health

Superintendent of Schools – On January 27th, I had the pleasure of being part of the kickoff for Langdon School’s Headstrong Summit. All grade 6 to 9 students and staff participated in a day long event to learn about mental health and stomp out the associated stigma. The school was able to garner phenomenal support through partners like Mental Health Commission of Canada’s Headstrong program, Alberta Health Services, Synergy, Connecteen, Stepping Stones to Mental Health, and some community groups.

I was provided the opportunity to say a few words to kick off the day. Here is the text of my message:

I am honoured to be here for a short bit this morning to help kick off your day where you are coming together as a community to talk and learn about mental health and help break the stigma related talking about mental illness.

 

Recently, I’ve seen a ton of commercials on TV and Twitter about the Let’s Talk series sponsored by Bell.  We all need to be encouraged to talk about our mental health – kids and adults too. We need to recognize that it is okay to talk about our mental health just like we talk about our physical health. No one blinks an eye if you talk about a sprained wrist, if you need glasses or if you are seeing your doctor for a checkup but somehow for many of us it is not okay to talk about if we are struggling with depression or anxiety or seeing a counselor. We need to change that.

 

I encourage you to:

  • be that friend who will listen without judging or thinking less of the person who shares their challenges.
  • be the same warm, caring and non-judgmental friend as you were before your friend opens up to you.
  • encourage friends that are struggling with their emotions, feelings, stress, anxiety, sadness to reach out and ask for help.  That help can come from any adult in your life – teacher / parent / grandparent / coach / older brother/sister. They might not have the answers but they can help find the answers.

 

Thanks to the school for organizing this event. Thanks to the presenters joining us today.

 

Lastly, Be brave! Reach out! Speak up!

Unfortunately, I was not able to stay for the full day where kids had small group opportunities to hear and learn from the stories of brave presenters, who shared their knowledge and their personal stories related to addiction, grief and anger, healthy relationships, acceptance, suicide, physical harm and other challenges. The event provided information to students about where they can turn to for help and the stories provided opportunities for students to learn, grow, accept and stomp out stigma.

Greg

Assurance in Action

Assurance in Action

Superintendent of Schools – As – sur – ance (noun) 1. A positive declaration intended to give confidence; a promise 2. Confidence or certainty in one’s own abilities.

Shortly, a number of senior RVS leadership staff will meet with Alberta Education staff to review our Annual Education Results Report (AERR) as part of Alberta Education’s Assurance Model Pilot. Our AERR is like a report card on how we are doing as compared to our 4-year plan, which say what we are doing (https://www.rockyview.ab.ca/publications/2015_2019_2). We connect our goals (Learners are engaged, supported and successful) to Alberta Education’s priorities. We report out on how we are doing using Alberta Education’s survey data, our own survey data, achievement and diploma exam results. Want to see what our AERR looks like? Check it out here -> https://www.rockyview.ab.ca/publications/2015_16_digital_aerr

Our AERR is provided in a digital format. As part of the assurance pilot we have flexibility and streamlined requirements with the expectation that we demonstrate strong stakeholder engagement in order to inform local priorities. The AERR is a summative piece that describes the previous school year. All that is in the AERR has actually been discussed earlier in the school year. We (and by “we”, I mean our amazing Communications team) take the disparate pieces of information and combine them into one place – our digital AERR.

The AERR is an accountability tool to ensure Boards are reporting to the public about student achievement along with successes and challenges. It is meant as a tool to provide transparency, while used for continuous improvement.

Recently, I had the opportunity to meet with various leaders to gather information about the various strategies and actions underway to help achieve the goals in our 4-year plan. It was an invigorating two days of meetings because we have so much going on. People want to make a positive difference for our learners and are dedicated to helping achieve our goals. At the Jan 26th Board meeting, we will provide a high-level overview on progress made toward the goals and outcomes. I encourage you to read that report, that will be posted here after the Board Meeting:  https://www.rockyview.ab.ca/publications/accountability-reports

Here is my assurance statement – I can assure you that RVS staff is working very hard, with extreme dedication, to empower the potential of our learners. In my visits to schools or when people are here at the Ed Centre, I see RVS staff committed to engage and support learners so that the learners can be successful. Our 4-year plan is alive through the actions of our staff making the learning real, visible and for everyone. Anyone visiting on of our schools will see that they serve as a living, dynamic, ongoing poster for our 4-year plan in action.

Feeding the World in 2050

Feeding the World in 2050

Vienna and Sydney, WG Murdoch School Students – How in the world will we feed 9 Billion people in the year 2050?  The Airdrie / Crossfield 4H Helping Hands Club went on an eye opening field trip Saturday, Jan. 21, to Journey 2050 and we think everyone needs to hear this message!

As the population pushes up to 9 Billion by the year 2050, will it be possible to produce enough food to feed everyone? This was the key question posed to our Airdrie /Crossfield Helping Hands 4H Club members who attended the Journey 2050 Educational Session sponsored by Agrium currently set up at the Agrium Western Event Centre at the Calgary Stampede grounds.

This engaging five-hour program is being offered to school groups, 4H groups and more from all over the Calgary Region. The goal is to teach students about how important jobs and roles in agriculture will be, and what they might look like, as the world braces for the reality that we will need to produce 65% more food from the current land and water base. Is that even going to be possible? What will it require? Our 4H group was lead through a guided conversation around these concepts with the instructors who taught the day long program through games and interactive challenges.

The activities placed in front of our members helping them learn about farming and food production practices around the world today and how agriculture is going to become even more important as an industry as the population grows. It was a great chance to learn from experts, and work alongside other 4H members from all over the Calgary region.

We personally will be in our 40s in the year 2050. How will our diet compare in 2050 with what we enjoy now? Our members discussed the importance of balancing environmental, social and economic issues as the world tackles the key question of what we will all have to do to secure food production for 9 billion.

Crops will likely need to change, we will need to find ways to put lands like swamps and mountainous terrain into use for rice production and grazing animals like goats that can adapt to rocky outcrops for grazing space. We will also need to preserve the current supply of farmable land and not mow it over with urban sprawl.

Our club members left the session feeling the weight of this challenging issue. We found ourselves talking about what we can do now to 1. Reduce our personal food waste, 2. Eat and consume sustainably, 3. Monitor and reduce our personal water use, 4. And how we can reduce our environmental footprint. This is only a small number of topics and questions posed in this day-long session. Our club members are very grateful for the chance to learn more about this important environmental question – we hope everyone in the Rocky View region will attend Journey 2050 while it is in Calgary and we would encourage classrooms and 4H clubs from around Rocky View to consider checking it out!

Big thanks to our 4H friends in the Flatlands for organizing a 4H day at Journey 2050. More information is available online at Journey2050.com

 

Integrating the Arts into Learning

Integrating the Arts into Learning

Principal, Elizabeth Barrett Elementary School – Engaging students should be at the forefront of everything we do as educators. We know that once students are engaged, learning is more likely to be alive and fluid. There is nothing more energizing than seeing children’s eyes light up and the excitement is contagious.

In addressing the 21st Century Competencies, such as critical thinking, collaborative learning and environmental stewardship, our current students are empowered to make differences in our world, with a consciousness of the positive impact they will have on our world.

Sharing student learning through the arts in an effective way of engaging learners. Our students are advocates for the arts. We are proud of their voices to provide leadership and sharing their work through the arts. The following link describes how the University of Calgary is connecting the importance of integrating the arts into elevating students’ consciousness of learning. http://tinyurl.com/rvsebspherald

We know enabling our students to self-reflect and become self-reliant learners is powerful. Reflecting on their learning and feeling confident is critical to becoming a lifelong learner. The article in the following link highlights one means by which students have been doing this at Elizabeth Barrett School by integrating the arts into their learning. http://tinyurl.com/rvsebsp1

We are in an exciting era of learning. Setting our students up to be successful is at the heart of what we do. Personal engagement of their learning is paramount to success. Being a part of this journey is a privilege.

 

Page 3 of 1012345...10...Last »