Feeding the World in 2050

Feeding the World in 2050

Vienna and Sydney, WG Murdoch School Students – How in the world will we feed 9 Billion people in the year 2050?  The Airdrie / Crossfield 4H Helping Hands Club went on an eye opening field trip Saturday, Jan. 21, to Journey 2050 and we think everyone needs to hear this message!

As the population pushes up to 9 Billion by the year 2050, will it be possible to produce enough food to feed everyone? This was the key question posed to our Airdrie /Crossfield Helping Hands 4H Club members who attended the Journey 2050 Educational Session sponsored by Agrium currently set up at the Agrium Western Event Centre at the Calgary Stampede grounds.

This engaging five-hour program is being offered to school groups, 4H groups and more from all over the Calgary Region. The goal is to teach students about how important jobs and roles in agriculture will be, and what they might look like, as the world braces for the reality that we will need to produce 65% more food from the current land and water base. Is that even going to be possible? What will it require? Our 4H group was lead through a guided conversation around these concepts with the instructors who taught the day long program through games and interactive challenges.

The activities placed in front of our members helping them learn about farming and food production practices around the world today and how agriculture is going to become even more important as an industry as the population grows. It was a great chance to learn from experts, and work alongside other 4H members from all over the Calgary region.

We personally will be in our 40s in the year 2050. How will our diet compare in 2050 with what we enjoy now? Our members discussed the importance of balancing environmental, social and economic issues as the world tackles the key question of what we will all have to do to secure food production for 9 billion.

Crops will likely need to change, we will need to find ways to put lands like swamps and mountainous terrain into use for rice production and grazing animals like goats that can adapt to rocky outcrops for grazing space. We will also need to preserve the current supply of farmable land and not mow it over with urban sprawl.

Our club members left the session feeling the weight of this challenging issue. We found ourselves talking about what we can do now to 1. Reduce our personal food waste, 2. Eat and consume sustainably, 3. Monitor and reduce our personal water use, 4. And how we can reduce our environmental footprint. This is only a small number of topics and questions posed in this day-long session. Our club members are very grateful for the chance to learn more about this important environmental question – we hope everyone in the Rocky View region will attend Journey 2050 while it is in Calgary and we would encourage classrooms and 4H clubs from around Rocky View to consider checking it out!

Big thanks to our 4H friends in the Flatlands for organizing a 4H day at Journey 2050. More information is available online at Journey2050.com

 

Integrating the Arts into Learning

Integrating the Arts into Learning

Principal, Elizabeth Barrett Elementary School – Engaging students should be at the forefront of everything we do as educators. We know that once students are engaged, learning is more likely to be alive and fluid. There is nothing more energizing than seeing children’s eyes light up and the excitement is contagious.

In addressing the 21st Century Competencies, such as critical thinking, collaborative learning and environmental stewardship, our current students are empowered to make differences in our world, with a consciousness of the positive impact they will have on our world.

Sharing student learning through the arts in an effective way of engaging learners. Our students are advocates for the arts. We are proud of their voices to provide leadership and sharing their work through the arts. The following link describes how the University of Calgary is connecting the importance of integrating the arts into elevating students’ consciousness of learning. http://tinyurl.com/rvsebspherald

We know enabling our students to self-reflect and become self-reliant learners is powerful. Reflecting on their learning and feeling confident is critical to becoming a lifelong learner. The article in the following link highlights one means by which students have been doing this at Elizabeth Barrett School by integrating the arts into their learning. http://tinyurl.com/rvsebsp1

We are in an exciting era of learning. Setting our students up to be successful is at the heart of what we do. Personal engagement of their learning is paramount to success. Being a part of this journey is a privilege.

 

Talking With My Kids

Talking With My Kids

Superintendent of Schools – Like many families, my family is a very busy family with everyone hustling to different events. In the fall and winter my family is consumed with hockey. Hockey practices, games, skating on the pond, skating treadmill appointment, hockey fundraising activities, getting skates sharpened, weekend tournaments, checking out the latest gear, spring hockey tryouts, etc. The same can be said for most families, but you can substitute soccer, basketball, dance, swimming, piano, language learning, skiing, dirt biking, 4-H, sledding, etc. for hockey.

It is challenging because it seems like all activities are asking youngsters and families to commit to only one activity. Specialization is commonplace and the days of kids playing multiple sports, while skiing recreationally and learning the piano are gone. Now that said, we are guilty as we allow ourselves and kids to get sucked up into the vortex of hockey in the fall & winter and baseball in the spring & summer.

Despite the busy schedule, we try and make the time to eat together most evenings. It remains the best opportunity for us to have conversations, check in with each other, and see what else is going on in our lives. I’ve recently engaged in another opportunity for discussions with the boys, the captive audience hockey road trip.

As we have two boys typically heading off in different directions for hockey, we have to divide and conquer. Both of the last two weekends I’ve been out of town with one of the boys at different hockey tournaments / away games. The drive to and from the event provided me the opportunity to talk with my boys. My car is the low-tech vehicle in the family, so there is no TV, videos, satellite radio, Xbox and Wi-Fi to distract us. This past weekend we listened to a story on CBC about the US election and it spurred a great conversation about democracy, political organizing, voter turnout, media, and more. We would not have had that conversation if not traveling in a car for an extended period. The previous weekend, as we drove down Hwy 2, it was talking about ranching, which neither my youngest nor I know much about. We were engaged in a conversation based on what we saw while driving. It was a place-conscious inquiry project where we just talked and on a few occasions had my son open up my phone to find out some information that furthered the conversation. Visiting towns that are new to us provides more opportunity to talk about what industries are in that town and why, the age of the hockey rink, and why it is where it is, how we develop an appreciation for things that are different and so much more.

We are fortunate that friends of ours always volunteer to drive their kid and their kid’s friends to and from events. The kids are older and often it means going out on a Saturday night at 11 pm (or later) to pick up a group of kids. I asked them why they do it and they told me, just like my hockey road trips, it creates an opportunity to talk and learn about what is going on in their kids’ lives and the lives of their friends. No need to stalk their Instagram account or SnapChats, the kids talk in the car. The adult can ask questions and while their own child typically rolls their eyes, other kids in the car will chime in and respond. They describe it as a direct pipeline into the lives of their kids.

So, the next time you are heading out to drive the kids somewhere, take the long route, turn off the radio (or put it on CBC), pretend you forgot the phone charger, and see where the conversation takes you.

Greg

Appreciating Our RVS Family

Appreciating Our RVS Family

christmas_freelargeSuperintendent of Schools – As the holiday season rapidly approaches I want to take a moment to share my appreciation for the fantastic people that make up Rocky View Schools. I have gained my appreciation by travelling throughout RVS and chatting informally with people, watching the countless tweets showcasing the great things going on in schools, attending community and school events, visiting schools, quiet conversations with students, observing the efforts of our staff, and living in a community within RVS.

What do I see? People who care, people who go above and beyond, people making a positive difference in our communities and with our youth. Whether it is a secretary, teacher, grounds person, education assistant, assistant principal, HR recruiter, afternoon caretaker, community volunteer coach, school tech and countless others – I see people who dedicate themselves to serve others. That is just how we roll in RVS. It is in serving others that we get our greatest rewards.

Our RVS team consistently puts others first. I see staff put students and their families ahead of themselves. I see the products of countless volunteer hours donated to make our schools an amazing place for learning, as well as a warm, welcoming and inclusive environment. I see our staff helping students contribute back to our communities and to the world. I smile with pride when I see our kids volunteering, raising funds for those less fortunate, finding their voice to identify injustice, and/or celebrating all that is right in the world. In most cases, it is with staff’s leadership, guidance, and support that the students are able to demonstrate their own leadership in our global society. Our staff models what it means to serve others.

As we reach the winter break, I want to say “thank you” to our entire RVS family. You make a difference in the lives of children, their families, your colleagues, and your communities. Thank you for all that you do. Thank you for welcoming me back into the RVS family with such kindness and concern for my family. Please be safe over the holiday, take the time to recharge your own batteries and try and do something for yourself and your family over the break.

Greg

Connected Learning = A Whole New World!

Connected Learning = A Whole New World!

RVS Teacher, Langdon School – Students from Langdon School recently had the opportunity to learn Japanese from a group of students in Honolulu, Hawaii. This wonderful opportunity was facilitated by Verena Roberts, a Technology Specialist with Rocky View Schools, and partner teacher Melvina Kurashige of the Mid-Pacific Institute. Interestingly, this connected learning opportunity began through our conversations on Twitter.

I had initially made some assumptions regarding this experience. I had assumed that it would be interesting and engaging for students to connect with peers from another country. I also had assumed that the work presented by students would be of a high quality, as they were presenting to a genuine audience. What actually occurred far exceeded my expectations; and that takes us back to 1998…

Before Instagram, and Twitter, and Facebook, and even MSN Messenger, there was ICQ Chat. I remember a classmate in high school telling me about this new program. He mentioned something along the lines of “yeah, this program is so cool, you can add your friends and talk to a bunch of people all at the same time”.

My initial reaction was disbelief. Was it truly possible to connect with multiple friends online at the same time? I eagerly rushed home and began using ICQ. To this day, I vividly remember the telltale “uh-oh” sound which accompanied an incoming message. At the time, I didn’t think of ICQ as a way of learning. I thought of it simply as a means of communication.

As I reflect upon this as an educator, it becomes clear that, although I was communicating with others, I also was learning about others. I would learn the score of the basketball game that night, or what one of my friends had for supper (Doreen Rowe’s Lasagna is fantastic, by the way). What fascinates me about this process as an educator, is that as technology has advanced, so has the ability to connect with others.

What if students were eager to rush to class, just as I had rushed home, to connect with and learn about others? What if students asked genuine questions to their peers in another country regarding their lives? What if these simple connections could break through barriers and help students to develop empathy for one another? What if this act of connecting could be a simple, yet effective method, as educators, to help students to genuinely understand and celebrate our differences and similarities???

…back to 2016. When my students connected recently with the Hawaiian students via a Google Hangout, many of these questions were answered. Watching students become more globally aware, while learning new content, has opened my perspective regarding connected learning. Students were learning content while also learning about one another. In this sense, they were more than just globally aware, they were entering a whole new world that involved becoming active global citizens, one step at a time.

The next step for my students in the connected learning journey involves the creation of Science games. The games will be shared with students in other countries as a genuine audience. This project has been supported by a community of practitioners through the Gamifi_ED2 project. Working with such a knowledgeable and supportive team is highly beneficial in supporting our students. I look forward to continued connected learning opportunities where students will connect with their peers internationally.