Girls in STEAM

Girls in STEAM

Technology Learning Specialist – On Nov. 23, my colleagues and I had the opportunity to work with an amazing group of 50 girls, their teachers and guests at the Girls in STEAM Day. STEAM is the integration of science, technology, engineering and math with the arts to stimulate inquiry, innovation and creativity.

The enthusiasm these young ladies had for learning, experimenting, failing and trying again was electric. The conference began with the girls creating name tags that represented them: who they were, their interests, and their aspirations for the future.

We then had the opportunity to listen to three outstanding RVS teachers (Jill Quirk, Jenn Hummel and Shauna Taves) and their students describe the ways they support girls in STEAM in their own schools. Students also discussed what STEAM meant and learned about the stereotypes and biases they may face in the future.

The rest of the day focused on hands-on activities: making Christmas cards with lights and circuits, doing science experiments that resulted in Christmas ornaments, learning about robotics and coding with Little Bits, Spheros, and EZ-robots, and creating a band with found instruments.

Why did we do this? We need to encourage girls, especially those between 11 and 15, to pursue their interest in science and math. Society is missing out on the diversity needed to stimulate innovation and creativity if we are not attracting girls to engineering, sciences and math.

In a study commissioned by Microsoft, Martin Bauer of the London School of Economics states, “Conformity to social expectations, gender stereotypes, gender roles and lack of role models continue to channel girls’ career choices away from STEM fields.”

“This means that governments, teachers and parents only have four or five years to nurture girls’ passion before they turn their backs on these areas, potentially for good,” states Microsoft. “When we encourage girls to pursue science and technology, we double our potential to solve problems.”

“If the cure for cancer is in the mind of a junior high girl, the odds are that we’ll never find it.”
– Dr. Jenna Carpenter, Louisiana Tech University

The Hour of Code is for Everyone!

The Hour of Code is for Everyone!

RVS Learning Specialist – Every year during Computer Science Week millions of students participate in an Hour of Code in their schools. Join Rocky View Schools and other schools around the world in the Hour of Code December 5 – 11th, 2016. This event is free and is suitable for K-12. Register your class or your whole school at https://hourofcode.com/ca   Use #rvsedcodes to tweet!

Coding, or computer programming, is what makes it possible for us to tell a computer what to do. Any application or function on your computer or your phone or tablet is a code someone created especially to run on your device. A calendar appointment pops up on your phone? Someone coded that. Your computer launches a program for you to watch a video? That was coded too. Learning to code is a little like learning a new language – in fact, it is considered a literacy. We know now that everyone can code. #EveryoneCanCodeswift-playground

Many begin with visual coding (using graphical images) for younger children and move into block coding (a form of visual coding) and then into textual coding languages such as Scratch, Swift and Java. Don’t be hesitant to try the visual coding – it helps builds the foundation for the others and it’s fun too!

Even our kindergarten and early elementary students can learn to code with the many websites and apps available and you do not need a robot or other device to learn. Lightbot is great for students just beginning to code while older students can use the code.org website with coding games such as Minecraft, Star Wars and Frozen.
Scratch is another website designed to help students learn to code (requires sign-in but teachers can create a class account or students can go directly to Create). Apple developed Swift Playground so if you have a newer iPad you can download this free app and the accompanying Anyone Can Code and Swift Playground guides from iBooks. They also just released a new Hour of Code Challenge in the App store and this Facilitator Guide.

There are many more free resources available to support teachers and students, whether they have years of experience or none at all. Contact your RVS Learning Specialists – Technology for more information.