Trustees – Serving Their Communities

Trustees – Serving Their Communities

Superintendent of Schools – Recently I attended a RVS Advocacy board committee meeting where one of the topics on the agenda was a discussion about how this Board can encourage, help, and support people considering running for trustee in the upcoming elections this fall. It is important to remember that I am not a Board member nor a trustee. A major part of my job is to actually support the Board and one of the ways is through supporting effective governance. I am a strong believer in public education and the important role that trustees have in providing the voice of the community.

The Alberta School Boards Association puts out a variety of materials to support potential trustees prior to each election. Locally, RVS has put out information packages for potential trustees, held an evening session to support candidates, published information about the election. Often people only have a vague idea of what a trustee does so I think it is important for people to gather plenty of information prior to making a decision to run for trustee. I can tell you it is a lot more work than the public two hour meeting every two weeks! Being a trustee is a rewarding opportunity to serve your community and does require dedication. In any given week/month trustees may also: attend committee meetings; attend school council meetings; meet with local government officials and MLAs; work and learn with other trustees in the zone/province; engage in professional learning related to the role; help parents navigate the system; research information; and countless other tasks.

According to the ASBA, “school board trustees are local politicians elected by and accountable to the community they serve. The school board has many responsibilities, including:

  • setting school division goals that ensure students have the knowledge and skills that enable them to be better prepared for life;
  • planning school division priorities based on provincial curriculum requirements, community input, available resources and best practices in education;
  • developing and implementing an annual budget for the school division based on curriculum requirements and strategic priorities;
  • developing policies to guide school division administration and employees toward division goals;
  • ensuring residents of the school division are regularly informed about the work and achievements of the school division;
  • advocating on behalf of the school community to decision-makers and stakeholders on important issues that affect education, and to ensure education is a top public priority;
  • ensuring regular opportunities for public input and access;
  • evaluating the school division’s chief executive officer – the superintendent of schools.”

According to our own RVS policy, here is what the role of a trustee is -> policy 3. Here is a link to information about what the Board does -> policy 2. These documents help provide the big picture view of what is expected of trustees.

If you know someone who is interested in running for in the fall election for a trustee, encourage them to attend a public meeting this spring, check out the ASBA website about the work of trustees and election information, continue to monitor the RVS website for more information, and/or talk to an existing trustee to gather more information. The nomination process will come up quickly in the fall (Sept 18th) so now is the time to think about the opportunity to serve your community by becoming a trustee.

Greg

p.s. As many of you reading this are RVS staff, there is rule which restricts your ability to run for trustee if, on nomination day, you are an employee of any school district, school division, charter school or private school as of nomination day – unless you take an unpaid leave of absence to run before the last working day prior to nomination day.

Students Leading Students

Students Leading Students

Superintendent of School – Leadership – ˈlēdərˌShipthe action of leading a group of people or an organization.

All too often people get caught up thinking that all leadership needs to come from the top of the org chart. I do not believe this to be true. I strongly believe that we are all leaders in different ways and  all can demonstrate leadership in a wide variety of ways. An important group of leaders we have in our organization is our students.

Many RVS schools have formal leadership programs. Students are given a voice in their school and help build and maintain a positive culture. These leadership groups are well beyond formal student government groups that existed when I went to school. These groups are now integral parts of a school’s fabric. Leadership students work collaboratively to address topics/issues that they want to support in their school / their community and as global citizens. Some students gravitate to these more formal roles, while other are quiet leaders in their classroom, club, team, bus, or peer group.

This week a variety of high school student leaders, with the guidance of two teachers – Dot and Scott – hosted RVS’ 10th annual middle school student leadership conference. The day is structured as an experiential learning opportunity, where younger leaders experience a number of activities and then reflect on the activities with a lens of how they could use such activities with other groups. The theme of the day was “Leadership Takes Flight” and I was asked to say a few words. So, given that theme, here was my message to the students:

Welcome to RVS Air, where you have a say in how we operate. You have a unique opportunity to influence where your journey will take you. As up-and-coming RVS Air leaders, you are provided an opportunity to be a tour guide for many other travelers in your school and communities. At RVS Air, we value a set of competencies that will serve you well no matter your destination. These include skills such as: critical thinking, problem solving, innovation, communication, collaboration, globally aware & civically engaged citizens, while being a self-directed learner who is literate in many domains.

Here at RVS Air, our leaders come in all shapes and sizes, but keys to success include: your ability to demonstrate enthusiasm; being well prepared; communicating effectively; caring for everyone – not just your buds; drawing on your creativity; helping to solve problems; demonstrating high character; being adaptable and dependable; and valuing everyone and encouraging people to work together to make a positive difference. Being a guide is not always easy, but you will get back what you put in. Every trip is not perfect, but you learn and build those learnings into your preflight checklist for next time. You are not the first person to take a trip so make sure you talk to fellow travelers to try and make the trip as successful as possible.

Today, fellow leaders will walk you through a variety of activities, provide opportunities for you to reflect on them and then later you will get to apply them on your own trips.

Thank you for joining the RVS Air leadership team. I am excited that you are part of our leadership team and good luck. Now, make sure your seat belt is securely fastened, your tray is in the upright and locked position. Bon Voyage.

Greg

Amazing Things Our Students Do

Amazing Things Our Students Do

Superintendent of Schools – I am so grateful for the many opportunities my role affords to get to see our RVS students excel, contribute, and make a difference in their communities. Teens especially get a bad rap in our society. Most adults forget what it was like as we transitioned from kids to young adults. We all made mistakes, and the occasional poor choice, but society seems stuck on judging all teens by their mistakes. I’d love to wear the body cam to share just some of the amazing things I get to see kids and teens routinely do.

I saw 75 teens from eight different school give up an evening and full day away from their regular classes to participate in RVS’ Honour Band. The concert band performed for a group of adults and students at Chestermere High as a culminating activity. The teens in the audience watched the concert – many of which probably would not list concert band on their top 10 interest lists – and where incredibly well behaved. They listened intently, recognized the efforts of kids from across the region, and when the concert ended, picked up their chairs and put them back – and then many turned around and grabbed the chairs for the adults in the room.

My twitter feed is consistently full of kids collecting something for those in need in their community, kids participating in basketball and curling playoffs/playdowns, grade 10 students working with grade 2s to share their knowledge and experiences, kids learning with members of our communities, kids teaching people in our communities, teens helping volunteer groups, teens raising funds for those in need both locally and globally, and teens taking on leadership roles within their schools. Watch the #rvsed hashtag or a couple of the schools in your community for a week and I assure you that you will feel a lot better about our communities and country when you see the amazing things our kids are doing.

Lastly, I cannot forget to recognize our amazing RVS staff who empower and enable students to make a difference. Our staff volunteer countless hours, create highly engaging environments, which allow kids to shine. Staff make a conscious effort to have high expectations and build skills so that students can be successful.

Greg

Making It Real

Making It Real

Superintendent of Schools – Our Four-Year Plan (4YP) has three key goals – learners are engaged, supported, and successful. Another means we use to describe the key work of RVS is making learning visible, real, and for everyone. One only needs to watch the #rvsed Twitter hashtag to see daily examples of how schools and staff create amazing learning opportunities for our students. In any given day, you will see teachers creating learning opportunities bringing those three concepts to life.

Last week I was at an event at Banded Peak School where students were given a place conscious challenge – utilization and beautification of a piece of land in the town area. In parallel, the community has created a committee looking at the space and trying to decide what to do with it. The students were challenged to design a functional space that would become a community asset. Students surveyed members of the community to see what people wanted. They asked about overall concept, preferred materials, activities that could take place in the space, and learned about lighting concerns, strategies to make the space low maintenance, and many other ideas. Students also met with local experts to gain further information. Students toured the site. Ultimately, students produced a scaled drawing, key information panels, and a model of the park. I was among a number of adults who walked through the student stations and had students explain the details of their designs. It was a great opportunity for making their learning visible.

Often we get caught up in the final product of the learning activity, but it is the process that is truly important. In gathering the information and ultimately explaining their learning to a stranger, students had plenty of opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of our 21C competencies. I asked students tough questions about their design and I am pleased to say they could answer the question or at least recognize the issue as a challenge in their design. The kids were invested in the activity because it was engaging and real. They walk or ride by the land in question and want to contribute to a solution to make it better. They were given an authentic problem and access to real world experts and resources. This was not open the textbook, read a chapter, and answer 1,2,4 and 7. Kids toured the site, learned the nuances of the land, looked at a solution from multiple perspectives, and had to handle competing priorities and diverse opinions. It was real and they made their learning visible.

As I mentioned earlier, this is a common occurrence in RVS. I saw on Twitter the previous week about grade 3 Sarah Thompson School students designing and building models/blueprints for ways to address opportunities and challenges in the hamlet of Langdon. They shared their ideas and presented to the local county Policy and Priorities committee. I cannot list all the examples so just watch #rvsed to see some of the amazing ways our staff are making it real.

Greg

Health and Safety Matters!

Health and Safety Matters!

Superintendent of Schools – This past week was dominated with water main leaks impacting our schools, staff and students. I continue to learn every week in my role and I know a lot more about water mains after this week! It served as another reminder of how often we take for granted so many services that impact our health and safety. Ensuring and maintaining the safety of our staff and students is a constant priority across RVS.

All RVS staff have a part in ensuring the safety of our sites – not just for kids but for the adults too. We all play an important role in identifying potential hazards, reporting those hazards and “near misses” to our supervisor, correcting issues before someone gets hurt, and learning from incidents and near misses through reviewing and sharing the findings. All staff take important and mandatory health and safety online training while others take specialized training in a wide variety of topics specific to their roles within the organization.

In late November and December RVS had an external auditor in to complete an occupational health and safety audit. The audit identified many of the good things going on in RVS but also identified some challenges for us. If you want to learn more about our health and safety program you can read Administrative Procedure AP411 – Occupational Health and Safety and/or the Employee Health and Safety section of our website. Over the upcoming months staff will see a more visible focus on health and safety.

The Board is committed to health and safety and in the fall approved the addition of a dedicated health and safety specialist for the division. The Board also recently approved a lengthy list of maintenance projects across RVS for 2016/17. The top priority items are those that impact health and safety. Again, this is the demonstration of putting our money where our mouth is when we say health and safety matters!

Greg

P.S. While on the topic of water main breaks, I do want to recognize the amazing efforts of countless staff in those impacted schools. Your efforts to ensure the safety while still keeping the school open for learning is much appreciated. To our maintenance crews who demonstrated their commitment and dedication – I cannot thank you enough!